Fair Use Week 2015

Fair Use Week 2014 poster
Fair Use Week Poster 2015 from Harvard Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) encourages  libraries to celebrate Fair Use Week February 23 – 27 because “…fair use is employed on a daily basis by students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material.” http://www.arl.org/component/events/event/148

The first Fair Use Week was sponsored at Harvard in 2014.

Do you know Fair Use?

From the US Copyright Office:

The doctrine of fair use has developed through a substantial number of court decisions over the years and has been codified in section 107 of the copyright law.

Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair.

1.      The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes

2.      The nature of the copyrighted work

3.      The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole

4.      The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

The distinction between what is fair use and what is infringement in a particular case will not always be clear or easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.

US Copyright Law Code Sections 107 thru 118 codify the provisions of Fair Use.

Links you can use about Fair Use:

From The Catholic University of America see these links  Fair Use guidelines at CUA chart; CUA Copyright Guidelines; and Copyright Q & A’s from the CUA Libraries.

For librarians and researchers see these links: ARL Code of Best Practices in Fair Use and  Research Library Issues, no. 285 (2015): Special Issue on Copyright 

Fair Use Week blog chronicles case studies and frequently asked questions on Fair Use  from the Harvard Libraries Office of Scholarly Communication; and follow the  Fair Use Week web site from ARL and on Twitter via @fairuseweek and #fairuseweek2015.

Research methodologies

Open access and social networking readings seem to be coalescing around the “idea” of reading carefully!

The Pew Research Center documents that usage of social media is increasing.  Two other articles question whether social media or open access have any impact on scholarly communications.

Social Media and Its Impact on Medical Research by Phil Davis

Is Open Access a Cause or Effect? by Phil Davis

Read carefully! It’s all in the methodologies.

 

Research Data Spring

If your academic communities and libraries are interested in data, research data management, research data services…then you will be excited about this new initiative from JISCResearch Data Spring. It is a project to support  research data management for UK universities.

The reason for excitement is what libraries strive for – to ” support the researchers’ workflows.”

Jisc launches collaborative initiative for UK research posted November 17, 2014

Publishing nightmares?

Have you noticed a new slide inserted into many presentations lately? “What keeps me/you – insert field or job here – awake at night?”

Librarians might say it is the high costs and complexity of content subscriptions. Today’s article Slow and Steady – Taking Time to Think in the Age of Rapid Publishing Cycles by Kent Anderson from The Scholarly Kitchen touches on many intertwined issues inducing librarian sleeplessness. The author discusses the case for rapid publication; the increase in research retractions; peer review; the increasing quantity of published research; corrections and credibility and cost issues. Are we seeing an “industrialization of research?”

Pushing for speed within the publication process may be putting a greater onus on our readers, eroding our brands, increasing skepticism/cynicism around the publication process, and diminishing the role of editors and publishers through a corrosive/erosive process. Maybe we should pause, rethink, and reassess the value of the filters we have created and how best to support, strengthen, and sustain them. Will a week longer make a huge difference? In which direction? Whose risk increases?

Open Access Week conversations

Are we ready to have conversations about Open Access?

Barbara Fister, from the library trenches, posts her response commenting on the recent court case ruling about e-reserves.

She asks if all of us are ready to talk about how the scholarly publication process – publishing and access – can be better at spreading knowledge.

Open Minds, Open Access by Barbara Fister

…if future publications are open access it could save us all a lot of anguish and (even better) knowledge could spread much more easily and widely. The money, and the future, is already here. It’s just distributed badly. We can do better, and we will, slowly but surely.

NIH and Big Data announcement

NIH Awards $32-Million to Tackle Big Data in Medicine by Paul Basken

NIH is funding studies to help researchers handle big data in medicine. The data collected and collated by the Human Genome Project was just the beginning.

“We see more and more the NIH as a digital enterprise,” said Philip E. Bourne, who this year became the agency’s first permanent associate director for data science.

NIH also recognizes the the problematic issues of big data in medicine: patient privacy, standards for data, and a commitment to sharing data.

Encouraging data sharing

The PLoS One  report published September 26, 2014, outlining new data sharing policies, infrastructure and tools indicates that it is good to share.

NIH Prodding Makes Data Sharing More Common, Survey Finds
Report: “Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences” ByGenevieve Pham-Kanter, Darren E. Zinner, and Eric G. Campbell published in PLoS ONE

To learn more about accessing data in the Social Sciences, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is holding a series of open webinars October 6 -9, 2014:

ICPSR Data Fair 2014: Powering Sustainable Data Access

For many years, ICPSR has hosted several public-access research data archives that are sustained by federal and foundation funding. ICPSR’s 2014 Data Fair will feature webinars about many of these archives and collections, including an introduction to the National Archive of Data on Arts and Culture; the R-DAS collection at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive; two Gates Foundation-funded collections at the Resource Center for Minority Data; an orientation to the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program; and a Q & A about the Gates Foundation-funded Measures of Effective Teaching Longitudinal Database. You will find descriptions of these webinars in the Data Fair program. Other offerings will include a presentation about ICPSR’s current efforts to fund and achieve sustainable public-access data sharing models, including its newly launched collection known as openICPSR.

NIH policy on genomic data sharing

“The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.” From post NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

The policy’s implementation is meant to accelerate biomedical discoveries, while safeguarding patient privacy and data sensitivity. Investigators applying for grant funding in January 2015 will need to supply data-sharing plans prior to the start of their research project.

“Everyone is eager to see the incredible deluge of molecular discoveries about disease translated into prevention, diagnostics, and therapeutics for patients,” said Kathy Hudson, Ph.D., NIH deputy director for science, outreach and policy. “The collective knowledge achieved through data sharing benefits researchers and patients alike, but it must be done carefully. The GDS policy outlines the responsibilities of investigators and institutions that are using the data and also encourages researchers to get consent from participants for future unspecified use of their genomic data.”

Along with statistics about the use of dbGaP data, the Nature Genetics report outlines the challenges facing the field, such as the increased volume and complexity of genomic data.

For a link to the GDS Policy see http://gds.nih.gov.

“Google Science”: Hoax or Disruptor

Just a note as we begin our new academic year. This blog space seeks highlight issues in scholarly communication including open access publishing, research data and alt-metrics.

Here is something to think about this week: Is Google the next big player in scholarly publishing?

How ‘Google Science’ could transform academic publishing

In part, whether Google is or is not ready to be the open access platform for scholarly communication, there are two hurdles 1) researchers’ practices and 2) the peer review process.

From the article, Timo Hannay, Managing Director of Digital Science is quoted:

The problem, he says, is not that there are too few options to publish in an open access format. It’s that most academics don’t think about it too much. “Most [academics] don’t particularly care about open access, in part because they are not incentivised to do so. This is changing, but only slowly, and right now most still care more about publishing in established, high-profile journals and in gaining a lot of citations.”

If Google, or another company, had a secret weapon to disrupt the peer review process, now that would be worth getting excited about.

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan was released on July 24, 2014. [Plan]

The Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented their own Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES – Beta) as a repository for federally funded research.

In US Department of Energy Announces Public Access Plan (David Crotty, Aug. 4, 2014), copyright issues, text and data mining access, and use of data management principles are discussed. These issues and more will need to evolve through communication and practice.

Will the DOE Public Access Plan constitute “major shift in the scholarly publishing landscape” as Crotty writes?

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Update: From DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

The Department of Energy’s Office of Science has issued a “Statement on Digital Data Management“<http://science.energy.gov/funding-opportunities/digital-data-management/>.  The new requirements regarding management of digital research data will appear in funding solicitations and invitations issued by the Office of Science beginning Oct. 1, 2014.   Other Energy Department research offices will implement data management plan requirements within the next year.