Resilience and Engagement in an Era of Uncertainty

The Coalition of Networked Information (CNI) held its biannual meeting in Washington, DC December 11-12, 2017. Clifford Lynch, Executive Director of CNI, gave his speech on the topic “Resilience and Engagement in an Era of Uncertainty.”  Lynch outlined a number of challenges that are facing digital scholarship.

  • The data refuge movement continues as librarians and scholars preserve data that is being pulled from web sites.
  • Some research funders are not supporting infrastructure to manage research data. Research funds and universities need to work together.
  • A very unstable world in politics and funding. Federal government is an unreliable steward (there are exceptions). Lynch states that “Memory and science are becoming increasing politicized in various ways.” The need to minimize single points of failure.
  • The end of network neutrality will happen (the speech was given before the decision was made by the FCC). What is our next step and will this make it harder for academic institutions?
  • An overall distrust of education, journalism, etc. makes it harder for us to do our work. It will get worse before it gets better. Also, how do we preserve this environment for later study?
  • Words are the dominate paradigm but this is rapidly being replaced with audio and video technological advancements. For example, machine learning algorithms can be used to compile audio and video of a celebrity to fabricate having him say things he never did. Authenticity becomes important.
  • Generative adversarial networks. Take two machine learning systems–one that recognizes fake images and the other that purposely create fake images–and have them talk to each other. Each system learns from the other and improves their own system. This appears to be a type of arms race.
  • Trails of provenance will become hugely important. Authenticity will be important and will have to founded on provenance and the infrastructure to capture it.
  • Open Access is not only important for scholarship but to society as well. Public libraries and other institutions are dependent on OA for maintaining a free society.
  • Replicable and reproducible research are important yet it does not make sense to expect that ALL research be reproducible. Some exploratory research is designed for experimentation and for uncover new ideas rather than for reproduction. Some research is based on interpretation and thus, cannot be reproduced.
  • We need outreach by scholars, scientists, and educators to defend scholarly communication on the public stage.

Lynch talked at length about open access. We need to recalibrate and reaffirm our commitments to open access. Decision points in the future: funding, policy matters, clarity by institutions about what they want, and storage of cultural evidence (from a non-academic environment) that is becoming the object of study by scholars. We will need to sort out how much we trust the cloud and cloud computing. Institutions need to re-examine our cloud strategy. We do not want all of our valuable material under one umbrella and this needs to be communicated to IT folks by librarians and archivists.

Last, Lynch talked about the technological uncertainties we face. Can we move from protoypes to social adoptions, specifically the issue of annotation? Hypothes.is is an example of annotation.  Questions: Who gets to annotate, who gets to see them, where are they stored, who is going to run the annotation server, and are the authors comfortable with being annotated?

Another issue is the notion of containers for preserving and sharing software: standard configurations, versioning, and proliferations of software are concerns moving forward.

Three developments in media that are growing and influencing academia:

  • The lifecycle of the capture to reproduction of 3D objects has happened. This will impact hugely on education as students will prefer to touch something rather than look at an image in a book.
  • Libraries of 3D objects need to be created for storage and retrieval while standards for this lifecycle and documenting provenance for authenticity, will need to be established.
  • Augmented reality beyond the academy in annotating places and architecture and annotating expereinces WHILE you are having the experience will be a future challenge. How do you store, preserve, retrieve, etc. all of this?

Other issues that are unclear and are still forming. For example, while there are prototypes and projects for linked data and cultural data, there are still problems of scalablity that need to be addressed. Quantum computing (which will invalidate authentification systems) and block chaining (how does it apply to educational institutions?) were briefly mentioned as topics of emerging concern.

Lynch ended his talk by mentioning effective collaborations based on shared values as becoming increasingly important to maximizing resources.

 

Many of the presentations were recorded and they can be found on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/cnivideo/videos .

Conference link: https://www.cni.org/events/membership-meetings/past-meetings/fall-2017

Institutionalizing Digital Scholarship at CUA

As the CUA Libraries continues expanding the digital scholarship opportunities for the CUA community, it may serve us to see what others have done. No better example can be found of the trials and tribulations of creating and supporting digital scholarship than the founding of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

Dr. Dan Cohen, the former director of the RRCHNM, gave the plenary address to the CNI-ARL Digital Scholarship Planning meeting at Brown University, November 8-10, 2017. Dan is the Vice Provost for Information Collaboration, Dean of Libraries, and Professor of History at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. He talked about the issue of institutionalizing digital scholarship. Establishing a digital scholarship center is challenging as he regaled the audience with tales from the establishment of the RRCHNM that was established at George Mason University Roy Rosenzweig in 1994 (cue the raccoons with fleas at 15:25 in the video below).

Cohen outlined three major themes that digital scholars and librarians will need to develop to be successful in insitutionalizing digital scholarship, what he calls “the three critical elements of institutionalization:

Routinizing

Working on individual projects is fine as librarians, and consulting with faculty and students in getting set up basic digital humanities projects goes with the territory. However, every librarian will tell you that such endeavors are time consuming and in the end, individually unsustainable. What is needed is a routinization of workflows, policies, and procedures with dedicated individuals expanding their knowledge of the larger process.

Normalizing

As Dr. Cohen mentions, new activities cannot remain on the fringe. “You have to make it normal that people on your campus do digital scholarship,” says Cohen. They need to be incorporated into your instiution’s workflow; in short, to be normalized into the everyday tasks of your organization. Outreach and developing allies who understand what you are doing and want to be part of digital scholarship. The long term goal is to have members of your institution think of the library when they think of digital scholarship practices.  In the end, this becomes a marketing exercise.

Depersonalization

Great ideas come from individuals (for the most part). These founders create new products and services. However, founders move on (or die) and many DS labs, centers, and organizations flounder and fall once the founder is gone. The digital scholarship paradigm within the academic instiution must not only survive but flourish when staff turnover takes place.  Every person involved in DS should make it a priority of how their projects and workflow will succeed them when they leave.

Lessons learned: Be careful not to spread yourself too thin. The nature of your institution will determine what you are able (and should offer) in the way of promoting the mission of the university through consultations, creating exhibits, experiential learning, information literacy classes, coding services, etc. Focusing on matching with faculty scholarly interests will be vital for success.

The full presentation is on YouTube and a summary of the talk is available on his blog.

 

ICYMI: Webinar on Author Rights and Predatory Journals

As a graduate student or new faculty member seeking an academic position, acquiring tenure, or being promoted, you will need to establish a scholarly presence and build your curriculum vitae. A building block in this process is publishing in quality academic journals (subscription-based or open access). Once your article has been accepted (oh joy!) for publication, publishers will require that you sign an author’s agreement. Do you know what it is you are signing? Navigating the scholarly journal terrain can be daunting task in finding the right journals for your article, neogtiating your rights with the publisher, identifying (and avoiding!) predatory journals, and determining if an open access journal meets your needs. This webinar will offer a general overview of each topic with useful hints and suggestions on navigating this complicated process.

This webinar was originally held on October 25th, 2017. Here is the recording:

 

If you have any questions or would like a research consultation, please contact:

Kevin Gunn
Coordinator of Digital Scholarship
314B Mullen Library
gunn@cua.edu
202-319-5504

Open Access Week Events (October 23rd – 29th)

Open Access Week is October 23 – 29, 2017. Open Access “is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*). As part of Open Access Week, CUA Libraries is offering a number of intiatives.

What is ORCID? As a faculty member or a graduate student, you should be establishing a scholarly presence and managing your scholarly reputation. Have you ever wondered:

  • if you have a common name or publish under various aliases (e.g. John Smith and J. Smith) whether you are getting credit for your research?
  • how to save time by integrating your manuscript and grant submission workflows (that is, by not having to enter your same information over and over again)?
  • how you can keep track of your scholarly output?

The solution is having a persistent digital identifier such an ORCID iD. Acquiring an ORCID account is necessary for professional advancement. In fact, many journals require that authors have ORCID accounts for manuscript submissions.  Watch this video for a quick overview.

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

ORCID stands for the Open Researcher and Contributor ID.  With an ORCID iD, you can integrate your research over various platforms such as Kudos, Mendeley, Scopus, Web of Science, and Humanities Commons. For example, ScienceOpen uses ORCID iD with “enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.”

Furthermore, funding organizations like the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health: SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae are requiring ORCID iD.

Publishers are collecting ORCID iDs during manuscript submission (e.g. Taylor and Francis), scholars are using it in Open Access platforms like PLOS (Public Library of Open Science), and even subscription databases like the Modern Language Association International Bibliography use ORCID iDs to distinguish scholars.

As part of Open Access Week (October 23-29th, 2017), CUA Libraries will have tables set up in various buildings on campus for students and faculty to sign up for an ORCID account.

  • MONDAY October 23rd
    Pangborn Portico
  • TUESDAY October 24th
    Hannan Foyer
  • WEDNESDAY October 25th
    Caldwell Lobby
  • THURSDAY October 26th
    McMahon Foyer
  • FRIDAY October 27th
    Mullen Library

 

All times are 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Drop by for 30 seconds and we will sign you up!

Your ORCID iD will belong to you throughout your scholarly career so acquire this unique identifier to showcase your research and ensure proper attribution of your work. If you cannot make the table sessions, follow these instructions in getting started:

1. Claim your free ORCID iD at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

 

Need help or have questions? Please contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship (gunn@cua.edu).


As a graduate student or new faculty member seeking an academic position, acquiring tenure, or being promoted, you will need to establish a scholarly presence and build your curriculum vitae. A building block in this process is publishing in quality academic journals (subscription-based or open access). Once your article has been accepted (oh joy!) for publication, publishers will require that you sign an author’s agreement. Do you know what it is you are signing? Navigating the scholarly journal terrain can be daunting task in finding the right journals for your article, neogtiating your rights with the publisher, identifying (and avoiding!) predatory journals, and determining if an open access journal meets your needs. This webinar will offer a general overview of each topic with useful hints and suggestions on navigating this complicated process.

author rights addendum

When: Wednesday, October 25th, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST

Where: Online (https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189)

Presenter: Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship, The Catholic University of America Libraries

Questions: Contact Kevin Gunn, 202-319-5504 or gunn@cua.edu

 

Connection details:

Please join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189

You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3212

Access Code: 110-395-189

First GoToMeeting? Try a test session: http://link.gotomeeting.com/email-welcome

Attendance is limited to 26 people.

 

Webinar: Know your rights! Navigating authors’ rights, predatory journals, and open access journals

As a graduate student or new faculty member seeking an academic position, acquiring tenure, or being promoted, you will need to establish a scholarly presence and build your curriculum vitae. A building block in this process is publishing in quality academic journals (subscription-based or open access). Once your article has been accepted (oh joy!) for publication, publishers will require that you sign an author’s agreement. Do you know what it is you are signing? Navigating the scholarly journal terrain can be daunting task in finding the right journals for your article, neogtiating your rights with the publisher, identifying (and avoiding!) predatory journals, and determining if an open access journal meets your needs. This webinar will offer a general overview of each topic with useful hints and suggestions on navigating this complicated process.

author rights addendum

When: Wednesday, October 25th, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST

Where: Online (https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189)

Presenter: Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship, The Catholic University of America Libraries

Questions: Contact Kevin Gunn, 202-319-5504 or gunn@cua.edu

 

Connection details:

Please join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189

You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3212

Access Code: 110-395-189

First GoToMeeting? Try a test session: http://link.gotomeeting.com/email-welcome

Attendance is limited to 26 people.

Open Access Week Events: What is ORCID?

Open Access Week is October 23 – 29, 2017. Open Access “is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*). As part of Open Access Week, CUA Libraries is offering a number of intiatives.

What is ORCID? As a faculty member or a graduate student, you should be establishing a scholarly presence and managing your scholarly reputation. Have you ever wondered:

  • if you have a common name or publish under various aliases (e.g. John Smith and J. Smith) whether you are getting credit for your research?
  • how to save time by integrating your manuscript and grant submission workflows (that is, by not having to enter your same information over and over again)?
  • how you can keep track of your scholarly output?

The solution is having a persistent digital identifier such an ORCID iD. Acquiring an ORCID account is necessary for professional advancement. In fact, many journals require that authors have ORCID accounts for manuscript submissions.  Watch this video for a quick overview.

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

ORCID stands for the Open Researcher and Contributor ID.  With an ORCID iD, you can integrate your research over various platforms such as Kudos, Mendeley, Scopus, Web of Science, and Humanities Commons. For example, ScienceOpen uses ORCID iD with “enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.”

Furthermore, funding organizations like the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health: SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae are requiring ORCID iD.

Publishers are collecting ORCID iDs during manuscript submission (e.g. Taylor and Francis), scholars are using it in Open Access platforms like PLOS (Public Library of Open Science), and even subscription databases like the Modern Language Association International Bibliography use ORCID iDs to distinguish scholars.

As part of Open Access Week (October 23-29th, 2017), CUA Libraries will have tables set up in various buildings on campus for students and faculty to sign up for an ORCID account.

  • MONDAY October 23rd
    Pangborn Portico
  • TUESDAY October 24th
    Hannan Foyer
  • WEDNESDAY October 25th
    Caldwell Lobby
  • THURSDAY October 26th
    McMahon Foyer
  • FRIDAY October 27th
    Mullen Library

 

All times are 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Drop by for 30 seconds and we will sign you up!

Your ORCID iD will belong to you throughout your scholarly career so acquire this unique identifier to showcase your research and ensure proper attribution of your work. If you cannot make the table sessions, follow these instructions in getting started:

1. Claim your free ORCID iD at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

 

Need help or have questions? Please contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship (gunn@cua.edu).

Digital Scholarship: About ORCID

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

From https://members.orcid.org/outreach-resources

ORCID iDs ensure you get credit for ALL of your work!

Do you worry about getting credit for your research because your name is common or you have publications under multiple aliases? Do you struggle to keep track of all of your research outputs? Are you annoyed by having to enter the same information over and over in manuscript and grant submission systems?

To solve these problems, there’s now ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID is registry of unique identifiers for researchers and scholars that is open, non-proprietary, transparent, mobile, and community-based. ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier to DISTINGUISH YOU from all other researchers, AUTOMATICALLY LINKING your professional activities. For example,

  • Funding organizations like the U.S. NIH, Wellcome Trust, and Portuguese FCT are requesting ORCID iDs during grant submission and plan to use it to reduce the burden of grant submission
  • Publishers are collecting ORCID iDs during manuscript submission, and your ORCID iD becomes a part of your publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you
  • Universities and research institutes such as Harvard, Oxford, Michigan, Boston, NYU Langone Medical Center, and Texas A&M encourage ORCID adoption, and many are creating ORCID iDs for their faculty, postdocs, and graduate students!
  • Professional associations like the Society for Neuroscience and Modern Language Association are incorporating ORCID iDs into membership renewal

Over time, this collaborative effort will reduce redundant entry of biographical and bibliographical data into multiple systems. Your ORCID iD will belong to you throughout your scholarly career as a persistent identifier to distinguish you from other researchers and ensure consistent, reliable attribution of your work.

To get started:

1. Claim your free ORCID iD at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

Digital Scholarship: October is for Open Access!

8-5x11oaweek2016_revisedHave you been keeping up with Open Access?  

Start with Barbara Fister’s August article The Acceleration of Open Access. She points to the new preprint servers making open access available, including SocArXiv, MLA Commons and the new (coming soon!) Humanities Commons.

See what’s the buzz about Sci Hub in this article,  The Current System of Knowledge Dissemination isn’t Working and Sci-Hub is Merely a Symptom of the Problem.

Closely watch the publishing industry by reading Elsevier’s New Patent for Online Peer Review Throws a Scare Into Open-Source Advocates.

See what universities are doing. The Journal Flipping Project from Harvard is a 2015-2016 project to gather options and best practices on converting subscription-based scholarly journals to open access. Iowa State University Libraries published a new guide Understanding Predatory Publishers.

Now that you are up on all the news, stay tuned for Open Access Week October 24-30, 2016!

 

 

 

Digital Scholarship: Piles of Books!

9201778105_63478565af_m
By Judit Klein https://www.flickr.com/photos/juditk/

This is the time of the semester, the reading is piling up. But, let us tempt you to take time to read for pleasure. Check out the CUA Popular Reading Collection!

Consider these thoughts;

“Last year, the average American over 15 years old spent around 3 hours watching television every day. In contrast, only 15 minutes a day were spent reading.” From Technology is Not the Death of Deep Reading by Emilie Hancock.

“Consider, however, the fact that, as Matthew Wilkens points out, in 2011 more than 50,000 new novels were published in the United States alone.  ‘The problem of abundance’ is a problem for every person who has an internet connection, and it is a professional problem in every corner of literary study.” From The Death, and Life, of Reading Have Been Greatly Exaggerated by Dr. Amy Hungerford

Our attention is divided and there is always more to read. The good news is, that while we may be spending less time reading, “People who read books regularly are on average more satisfied with life, happier, and more likely to feel that the things they do in life are worthwhile.” 2014 BookTrust Report.

Dr. Hungerford finishes,

My friend the Welsh poet Gwyneth Lewis offers a culinary metaphor: The attention of readers is not, she says, “a boiled egg” but “an omelet.” This is a beautiful and generous thought. Treated with skill and respect, the mind of the reader — and the collective of many readers’ minds — can contain multitudes. In the face of a multitude of books curated most often by the profit motive, it is incumbent upon those somewhat protected from market imperatives — that is, scholars paid by universities to spend their time reading and thinking and teaching and writing — to stuff the omelet deliberately. To do that, we will all need to scour the shelves for the most delicious ingredients, and also set some loudly touted ones aside.

How do you keep up with your reading? No wonder you may need a late night snack to power you through!

 

 

Digital Scholarship: Citation Needed

Cite your sources.

Never have we needed this exhortation more. We won’t make the case here again (because we have before!) Digital scholars use digital tools – use a reference manager as you research and write.

CUA Libraries provide RefWorks and EndNote Online for researchers, but there are other products. For help getting started with reference managers, please Meet with a Librarian.

Take a few minutes to enjoy this Plagiarism Rap from the University of Alberta!