Research Data Services

“Google Science”: Hoax or Disruptor

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Just a note as we begin our new academic year. This blog space seeks highlight issues in scholarly communication including open access publishing, research data and alt-metrics.

Here is something to think about this week: Is Google the next big player in scholarly publishing?

How ‘Google Science’ could transform academic publishing

In part, whether Google is or is not ready to be the open access platform for scholarly communication, there are two hurdles 1) researchers’ practices and 2) the peer review process.

From the article, Timo Hannay, Managing Director of Digital Science is quoted:

The problem, he says, is not that there are too few options to publish in an open access format. It’s that most academics don’t think about it too much. “Most [academics] don’t particularly care about open access, in part because they are not incentivised to do so. This is changing, but only slowly, and right now most still care more about publishing in established, high-profile journals and in gaining a lot of citations.”

If Google, or another company, had a secret weapon to disrupt the peer review process, now that would be worth getting excited about.

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan was released on July 24, 2014. [Plan]

The Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented their own Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES – Beta) as a repository for federally funded research.

In US Department of Energy Announces Public Access Plan (David Crotty, Aug. 4, 2014), copyright issues, text and data mining access, and use of data management principles are discussed. These issues and more will need to evolve through communication and practice.

Will the DOE Public Access Plan constitute “major shift in the scholarly publishing landscape” as Crotty writes?

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Update: From DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

The Department of Energy’s Office of Science has issued a “Statement on Digital Data Management“<http://science.energy.gov/funding-opportunities/digital-data-management/>.  The new requirements regarding management of digital research data will appear in funding solicitations and invitations issued by the Office of Science beginning Oct. 1, 2014.   Other Energy Department research offices will implement data management plan requirements within the next year.

 

Open Access Survey from T&F

Monday, July 21st, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Post expires at 10:23am on Tuesday October 21st, 2014

Altmetrics for librarians and researchers

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Altmetrics – as an alternative measure of impact for scholarly research – are in the news.  The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and the San Fransisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) are researching and recommending metrics other than traditional journal impact factors for measuring scholarly impact.

Ernesto Priego writes in On Metrics and Research Assessment that article level metrics will be more important for “international public access and impact.”

The success of automated methods to obtain quantitative indicators of the reach, reception and use of scholarly outputs depends on our ability as scholarly communities to realise and develop the potential of the Web for scholarly communications.

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) just wrapped up their ACM Web Science Conference Workshop in June 2014. Papers and presentations are available at the conference web site -  altmetrics14: expanding impacts and metrics.

Librarians involved with scholarly communications and consulting with researchers can learn from 4 things every librarian should do with altmentrics. [Impact Story is a nonprofit, open-source webapp that helps scientists discover and share the full impact of their research - everything from citations to their articles to tweets about their software to downloads of their datasets. ]

The Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) published their April/May 2013 bulletin on Altmetrics: What, Why and Where.

Lastly, Indiana Libraries provides us with 17 More essential Altmetrics Resources (the Library version.)

Now you know!

 

 

 

Data literacy is storytelling

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Readings on data this week include the importance of data literacy Are You Data Literate? Education For the Data Economy – why aren’t we teaching this in 8th grade?

We collect data and use data effectively to enhance our experiences and tell stories, says Ramesh Jain, a UC Irvine professor and big data researcher. From The Storytelling Mandate of Big Data by Alex Woodie.

Leading us to The 5 Most Influential Data Visualizations of All Times – telling stories with data!

Post expires at 12:57pm on Thursday September 25th, 2014

Data envisioned: Dr. Hans Rosling new presentation

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Dr. Hans Rosling‘s 2006 TED talk  showed population distributions and related global data in a new visualizations. He is back with a new presentation from Nordiskemediedager entitled Facts and Fiction on Global Health NMD 2014.

Related article: It is not about political views or ideologies, it is blunt facts which are not known by Nerobonkers May 29, 2014

 

Two articles on reproducibility of data

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman
Posted in Research Data Services

Public access to data will lead to reproducible results – or will they?

A January 2014 article “Policy: NIH plans to enhance reproducibility” speaks to the self-correcting nature of biomedical data. The Scholary Kitchen, a blog site on scholarly communication, posits in “Reproducible Research: A Cautionary Tale” that some data lends itself to reuse and verification; while cell data and procedures are not quite as easy to reproduce.

Collins, F. S., & Tabak, L. A. (2014). Policy: NIH plans to enhance reproducibility. Nature, 505(7485), 612-613. doi:10.1038/505612a

Posted by David Crotty. (2014). Reproducible research: A cautionary tale | the scholarly kitchen.

 

Chronicle of Higher Education Available to Entire CUA Community

Thursday, March 13th, 2014 by Joan Stahl
Posted in Access Services, Applied Sciences, Catholic History, Collection Management, Humanities, Life Sciences, Music, Rare Books, Reference & Instruction, Religious Studies, Research Data Services, Semitics/ICOR, Tech Tools and Tips, University Archives

Chronicle.com is your gateway to on campus and remote access to the reputable publication, The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as several e-newsletters, job listings, a blog, and forums for discussions.  This is the essential resource for those who want to keep up with the latest news, trends, facts and figures in higher education.

To set up a personal account that allows you to select newsletters and features that will automatically be received on your desktop, ipad, smartphone, or tablet,  if you are on or off campus, go to Chronicle.com and click on login. Then click on “Create a free Account. Enter and confirm your university e-mail address, then follow the steps on the account setup pages.  Note: The locks will still appear on premium content but you will have access.

Post expires at 8:37am on Thursday May 15th, 2014