Digital Scholarship: What’s Next?

Call it being curious. Call it being proactive. Call it being engaged. Maybe it is just human to look to the future. Here are some reports from 2015 and 2016 that give us clues to what the future of learning and libraries may look like.

Libraries & Learning

2016 ALA State of America’s Libraries Report
2016 PEW Libraries and Learning
Horizon Report 2015 Library Edition
2015 IMLS FOCUS SUMMARY REPORT: LEARNING IN LIBRARIES
2015 CLIR The Center of Excellence Model for Information Services

Trends in Digital Scholarship

SPEC Kit 350: Supporting Digital Scholarship (May 2016)
2015 CLIR Building Expertise to Support Digital Scholarship: A Global Perspective

Data!

NISO Alternative Assessment Metrics (Altmetrics) Initiative: Persistent Identifiers in Scholarly Communications
NISO Alternative Assessment Metrics (Altmetrics) Initiative: Alternative Outputs in Scholarly Communications
2015 The Metric Tide: Report of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management
‘Preserving Transactional Data’: new DPC Technology Watch Report

Sam Seaborne, of The West Wing: Season 2, Episode: Galileo, reminds us to ask “what’s next?

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Predictive Analytics, it’s a Rap by Dr. Data!

A new title this month at Mullen Library is Mathematics Without Apologies: Portrait of a Problematic Vocation by Michael Harris. No apologies here if your vocation is data  – Dr. Data drops first choreographed rap video about predictive analytics. Thanks, Eric Siegel, Ph.D.!

Predictive analytics learns from the data you supply,
and predicts if you will click, buy, lie, or die.
It ain’t astrological – it’s math, it’s methodological.
So better pay attention cause my flow is pedagogical. [Full lyrics]

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Data to the Rescue?

People Have Mixed Hopes About Whether Open Data Will Improve ThingsValid data and a belief that government is a public good can be motivators in society. The PEW Research Center 2015 report Americans’ Views on Open Government Data documents the not-quite-tipping-point of the value of open data. It seems the jury is still out!

More data is available everyday:

DATA.GOV – managed and hosted by the U.S. General Services Administration, Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies

OECD Data – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

World Bank Data – Economic Indicators

DC Open Data – District of Columbia GIS (DC GIS)

Researchers are working toward shared definitions and repositories of data. Data management is an added task that researchers find troublesome. Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Data to the Rescue?”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Where’s the Data?

Researchers at universities are beginning to think beyond the requirements to author a data management plan. Kristen Briney, Data Services Librarian at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee has taught and advised researchers on practical data management, creating data management plans and working with electronic lab notebooks. Her recently published TedxUMilwaukee Talk Rethinking Research Data asks researchers to go further and publish their data when they publish an article.

 

NIH policy on genomic data sharing

“The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.” From post NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

The policy’s implementation is meant to accelerate biomedical discoveries, while safeguarding patient privacy and data sensitivity. Investigators applying for grant funding in January 2015 will need to supply data-sharing plans prior to the start of their research project.

“Everyone is eager to see the incredible deluge of molecular discoveries about disease translated into prevention, diagnostics, and therapeutics for patients,” said Kathy Hudson, Ph.D., NIH deputy director for science, outreach and policy. “The collective knowledge achieved through data sharing benefits researchers and patients alike, but it must be done carefully. The GDS policy outlines the responsibilities of investigators and institutions that are using the data and also encourages researchers to get consent from participants for future unspecified use of their genomic data.”

Along with statistics about the use of dbGaP data, the Nature Genetics report outlines the challenges facing the field, such as the increased volume and complexity of genomic data.

For a link to the GDS Policy see http://gds.nih.gov.