Digital Scholarship: October is for Open Access!

8-5x11oaweek2016_revisedHave you been keeping up with Open Access?  

Start with Barbara Fister’s August article The Acceleration of Open Access. She points to the new preprint servers making open access available, including SocArXiv, MLA Commons and the new (coming soon!) Humanities Commons.

See what’s the buzz about Sci Hub in this article,  The Current System of Knowledge Dissemination isn’t Working and Sci-Hub is Merely a Symptom of the Problem.

Closely watch the publishing industry by reading Elsevier’s New Patent for Online Peer Review Throws a Scare Into Open-Source Advocates.

See what universities are doing. The Journal Flipping Project from Harvard is a 2015-2016 project to gather options and best practices on converting subscription-based scholarly journals to open access. Iowa State University Libraries published a new guide Understanding Predatory Publishers.

Now that you are up on all the news, stay tuned for Open Access Week October 24-30, 2016!

 

 

 

Digital Scholarship: State of Mind

6807361770_9c95bfd5b6_zAs a new academic year begins – how’s your glass? Half full? Half empty?

We are excited to have students and faculty teeming back into the library as the school year begins on campus. We work with students of all ages at a university. Gen-Xer’s and Millennials make us look at life from their point of view. They make us learn.

Read the Class of 2020 Mindset List from Beloit College at the beginning of this semester. Item #15 may be relevant as we roll out new services at the University Libraries.

15. They have never had to watch or listen to programs at a scheduled time.

Our invitation to all students and faculty is to make an appointment with a librarian on your schedule!

In this season of change, find meaning and purpose in reading. We recommend a new work of fiction –  The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047  by Lionel Shriver. It is scary (as in this could be happening right now) good!

“The Mandibles is about money. Thus it is necessarily about bitterness, rivalry, and selfishness—but also about surreal generosity, sacrifice, and transformative adaptation to changing circumstances.” Wall Street Journal

Reading broadly about higher education, you may agree with both of the following articles.

Is “uberization” the term that now defines higher education? From David Theo Goldberg’s essay The Dangers of the Uberization of Higher Education:

“Broadly conceived, Uber represents on-demand access, a claim to a flawless experience with minimized hassle, immediate gratification, all at the best going rates. It provides a digital platform drawing together the elements necessary for instant delivery while hiding from view some of the significant delivery costs, such as maintenance and operations, health care and Social Security.”

Joshua Kim counters in The Bright Future of Higher Ed and asks “Is it possible to be simultaneously believably positive and realistically critical about the future of postsecondary education?”  He finds hope in our students, our educators and our practices.

Today’s students are smarter, more interesting, and more curious than at any time in the past. I attribute much of the goodness I see in our students to the fact that our student bodies are ever more diverse. Diverse by gender, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, national origin, and every other way that we measure diversity. This diversity has brought an energy to our campuses that did not exist when I was an undergraduate (1987-1991) – a diversity path that will only expand following future demographic trends.

On the digital scholarship front, Barbara Fister sums up a rapidly changing landscape in The Acceleration of Open Access

…with so many projects taking off, and with such robust platforms rolling out to challenge whatever the big corporations will have to offer, I’m feeling pretty optimistic about our capacity to align the public value of scholarship with our daily practices – and optimistic about the willingness of rising scholars to change the system.

Happy new year! Work hard! Be kind! Read!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Celebrate #FairUseWeek16

Celebrate Fair Use Week 2016 – what better way to keep learning and keep up with the author’s issues than by listening to Peter Suber discuss open access!

Gary Price, Editor, infoDOCKET and Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Open Access Project and the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication discuss key issues in the Open Access (OA) movement. Questions include: What are some of the key open access issues authors and librarians don’t understand? What are your thoughts about predatory publishing and possible solutions to it?

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Building Digital Scholarship

In October 2015, CUA Libraries hosted three events on open access. The video presentation for the second event is now available. Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian at UMD presented on the work he has done to build the Digital Repository for the University of Maryland, DRUM.

See the CUA Libraries Institutional Repository at Digital Collections.

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open for Collaboration Every Week!

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Let the #openaccesscua conversations continue!

During October 2015 the CUA University Libraries hosted three events to start people talking about open access.

How Open Access Benefits Faculty and Research; Open Access & Institutional Repositories; and Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem.

Rikk Mulligan, ARL provided overview slides and panel moderation for our third event; read the blog post from Kevin Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services.

Thanks to all who presented, all who came to the presentations and all those who asked questions! Questions came from university administrators and faculty and graduate students and librarians. Questions during the events ranged from – what is open access  – to mandates for open access – to levels of open access – to what will really increase the access, preservation and impact of a university’s scholarly output?

One question kept coming up in every event – how do we keep up with the evolving issue of open access? During the Scholarly Publishing event, the moderator, Rikk Mulligan from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) pointed to three headlines from last week:

From Martin Paul Eve, Academia.edu’s peer-review experiments 

From Kathleen Fitpatrick, Academia, Not Edu 

And, this announcement, Groundbreaking University of California policy extends free access to all scholarly articles written by UC employees

It is obvious from these articles and our events that open access conversations across the campus will continue!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Where is it?

University communities add to open access scholarship by building their own institutional repositories. During Open Access Week 2015, CUA University Libraries hosted Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian at University of Maryland Libraries.  Mr. Owen shared the history and experiences of building DRUM, the institutional repository at UMD. See the presentation here.

Kevin Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services, writes about the event at Open Access and Institutional Repositories: the DRUM Experience.

CUA Libraries institutional repository can be found at Digital Collections.

Please join us for our next Open Access event!

Oct. 28 @ 6:30 pm—Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem (Busboys & Poets)

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Grades & Shades of OA

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CUA hosted Dr. Steven Lerman, Provost and Geneva Henry, University Librarian from George Washington University today as keynote speakers on Open Access. Kevin B. Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services wrote about the presentation and conversation in his blog, Open Access and Faculty Acceptance.

Ms. Henry provided a succinct overview of a complicated topic and reminded us to know the grades – the spectrum – of open access models; and the shades of open access – Gold OA (delivered by journals) and Green OA (delivered by self-archiving in repositories.)

Open Access (book) by Peter Suber
Yes, it’s Open Access!

SHADES OF OPEN ACCESS

  • GOLD Open Access
  • Journals make articles available at the time of publication
  • A variety of payment models
  • Some gold journals are for profit, others are non-profit
  • GREEN Open Access
  • Repositories that make published articles openly available
  • University open access policies are green
  • Requires permission from publishers, but most permit green OA
  • Increased readership and more citations

For more on Gold OA & Green OA see Open Access by Peter Suber (section 3.1.)

Please join us for the next two events on Open Access!

Oct. 20 @ 4 pm—Institutional Repositories (Mullen Library, May Gallery)
Oct. 28 @ 6:30 pm—Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem (Busboys & Poets)

All events are free and open for everyone to attend!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Questions and Conversations

OpenAccess for BB&P

The questions and conversations about open access (OA) have been happening for over a decade. Open Access was first codified in the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2002. Open Access now exists as a “mix of fully open access publishers, hybrid publishers who offer some open access titles, and publishers who provide open access articles alongside subscription-only articles in the same journal.” Read the update Open Access Publishing: What it is and how to sustain it by Marcus Banks (September 8, 2015) here.

Open Access is an issue at research universities. From the 2008 Harvard Open Access mandate to the 2013 OSTP Open Access policy and the University of California Open Access policy – open access to scholarly research is evolving. What is the current state of Open Access? Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Questions and Conversations”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: October and #openaccesscua

Please join us for a series of programs marking

International Open Access Week

OPEN FOR COLLABORATION

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: How Open Access Benefits Faculty + Research

Tuesday, October 13 11:00 AM Great Room A, Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center

Learn about the experiences at universities that have adopted an open access policy.

  • Dr. Steven Lerman, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, George Washington University
  • Geneva Henry, University Librarian and Vice Provost for Libraries, George Washington University

PRESENTATION: Institutional Repositories

Tuesday, October 20 4:00 PM May Gallery, Mullen Library

Consider the impacts of institutional repositories and how they affect faculty and student contributors.

  • Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Digital Repository at the University of Maryland (DRUM)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Scholarly Publishing and the Open Access Ecosystem

Wednesday, October 28 6:30 PM Pearl Bailey Room, Busboys & Poets (Brookland)

What do scholarly authors and researchers need to know?

  • Dr. Rikk Mulligan, ACLS Public Fellow and Program Officer for Scholarly Publishing, Association of Research Libraries

FACULTY PANEL

  • Dr. Trevor Lipscombe, Director, The Catholic University of America Press
  • Dr. James Greene, Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies, The Catholic University of America
  • Dr. Jennifer Paxton, Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of History, and Assistant Director, Honors Program, The Catholic University of America

University Libraries Wordmark

These events are open to the public. No R.S.V.P. required. Please contact Kim Hoffman at hoffman@cua.edu at least one week prior to the event to request disability accommodations. In all situations, a good faith effort (up until the time of the event) will be made to provide accommodations.

 

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Scholarly Ecosystem

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication graphic
101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication

The scholarly ecosystem gets more complicated every day. As this graphic depicts- click for larger size –  there are new tools being used by researchers every day to discover, access, and use scholarly research.

Until the Open Access movement gains ground, most researchers are beholden to content providers, services, and academic libraries for their access to scholarly research in e-content form. And that access could be better!

Roger Schonfeld writes of the stumbling blocks to this access in Dismantling the Stumbling Blocks that Impeded Researchers’ Access to e-Resources:

To adapt, publishers, libraries, and intermediaries need to examine not only the usability of their own platforms and how they can continue to be improved, but also how they are in practice used in scholarly research alongside other platforms and services. To do so, they cannot bring researchers into their usability labs, but instead they must engage researchers in their workplaces, in campus offices, labs, libraries, and dorms, and equally in off-campus homes and housing.

At the main information desks of research libraries, desktop workstations are used to test access and services to e-resources; while our researchers are living in a multi-device digital world of mobile, laptop, and tablet access. We will be examining parts of this scholarly ecosystem in the coming months and its impact on our users.

Tools to use:  Today, ProQuest (content provider) announced a partnership with Google Scholar to provide journal and conference connections through Google Scholar. The University of Pittsburgh University Library System provides this helpful Scholarly Communications glossary; and the graphic above is from the  101  Innovations in Scholarly Communications project and begins to congregate the new tools and workflows our researchers are using.