Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open for Collaboration Every Week!

Let the #openaccesscua conversations continue!

During October 2015 the CUA University Libraries hosted three events to start people talking about open access.

How Open Access Benefits Faculty and Research; Open Access & Institutional Repositories; and Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem.

Rikk Mulligan, ARL provided overview slides and panel moderation for our third event; read the blog post from Kevin Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services.

Thanks to all who presented, all who came to the presentations and all those who asked questions! Questions came from university administrators and faculty and graduate students and librarians. Questions during the events ranged from – what is open access  – to mandates for open access – to levels of open access – to what will really increase the access, preservation and impact of a university’s scholarly output?

One question kept coming up in every event – how do we keep up with the evolving issue of open access? During the Scholarly Publishing event, the moderator, Rikk Mulligan from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) pointed to three headlines from last week:

From Martin Paul Eve,’s peer-review experiments 

From Kathleen Fitpatrick, Academia, Not Edu 

And, this announcement, Groundbreaking University of California policy extends free access to all scholarly articles written by UC employees

It is obvious from these articles and our events that open access conversations across the campus will continue!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Where is it?

University communities add to open access scholarship by building their own institutional repositories. During Open Access Week 2015, CUA University Libraries hosted Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian at University of Maryland Libraries.  Mr. Owen shared the history and experiences of building DRUM, the institutional repository at UMD.

Kevin Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services, writes about the event at Open Access and Institutional Repositories: the DRUM Experience.

CUA Libraries institutional repository can be found at Digital Collections.

Please join us for our next Open Access event!

Oct. 28 @ 6:30 pm—Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem (Busboys & Poets)

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Grades & Shades of OA



CUA hosted Dr. Steven Lerman, Provost and Geneva Henry, University Librarian from George Washington University today as keynote speakers on Open Access. Kevin B. Gunn, CUA Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services wrote about the presentation and conversation in his blog, Open Access and Faculty Acceptance.

Ms. Henry provided a succinct overview of a complicated topic and reminded us to know the grades – the spectrum – of open access models; and the shades of open access – Gold OA (delivered by journals) and Green OA (delivered by self-archiving in repositories.)

Open Access (book) by Peter Suber
Yes, it’s Open Access!


  • GOLD Open Access
  • Journals make articles available at the time of publication
  • A variety of payment models
  • Some gold journals are for profit, others are non-profit
  • GREEN Open Access
  • Repositories that make published articles openly available
  • University open access policies are green
  • Requires permission from publishers, but most permit green OA
  • Increased readership and more citations

For more on Gold OA & Green OA see Open Access by Peter Suber (section 3.1.)

Please join us for the next two events on Open Access!

Oct. 20 @ 4 pm—Institutional Repositories (Mullen Library, May Gallery)
Oct. 28 @ 6:30 pm—Scholarly Publishing & the Open Access Ecosystem (Busboys & Poets)

All events are free and open for everyone to attend!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Questions and Conversations

OpenAccess for BB&P

The questions and conversations about open access (OA) have been happening for over a decade. Open Access was first codified in the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2002. Open Access now exists as a “mix of fully open access publishers, hybrid publishers who offer some open access titles, and publishers who provide open access articles alongside subscription-only articles in the same journal.” Read the update Open Access Publishing: What it is and how to sustain it by Marcus Banks (September 8, 2015) here.

Open Access is an issue at research universities. From the 2008 Harvard Open Access mandate to the 2013 OSTP Open Access policy and the University of California Open Access policy – open access to scholarly research is evolving. What is the current state of Open Access? Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Questions and Conversations”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: October and #openaccesscua

Please join us for a series of programs marking

International Open Access Week


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: How Open Access Benefits Faculty + Research

Tuesday, October 13 11:00 AM Great Room A, Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center

Learn about the experiences at universities that have adopted an open access policy.

  • Dr. Steven Lerman, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, George Washington University
  • Geneva Henry, University Librarian and Vice Provost for Libraries, George Washington University

PRESENTATION: Institutional Repositories

Tuesday, October 20 4:00 PM May Gallery, Mullen Library

Consider the impacts of institutional repositories and how they affect faculty and student contributors.

  • Terry Owen, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Digital Repository at the University of Maryland (DRUM)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Scholarly Publishing and the Open Access Ecosystem

Wednesday, October 28 6:30 PM Pearl Bailey Room, Busboys & Poets (Brookland)

What do scholarly authors and researchers need to know?

  • Dr. Rikk Mulligan, ACLS Public Fellow and Program Officer for Scholarly Publishing, Association of Research Libraries


  • Dr. Trevor Lipscombe, Director, The Catholic University of America Press
  • Dr. James Greene, Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies, The Catholic University of America
  • Dr. Jennifer Paxton, Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of History, and Assistant Director, Honors Program, The Catholic University of America

University Libraries Wordmark

These events are open to the public. No R.S.V.P. required. Please contact Kim Hoffman at at least one week prior to the event to request disability accommodations. In all situations, a good faith effort (up until the time of the event) will be made to provide accommodations.


Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Scholarly Ecosystem

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication graphic
101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication

The scholarly ecosystem gets more complicated every day. As this graphic depicts- click for larger size –  there are new tools being used by researchers every day to discover, access, and use scholarly research.

Until the Open Access movement gains ground, most researchers are beholden to content providers, services, and academic libraries for their access to scholarly research in e-content form. And that access could be better!

Roger Schonfeld writes of the stumbling blocks to this access in Dismantling the Stumbling Blocks that Impeded Researchers’ Access to e-Resources:

To adapt, publishers, libraries, and intermediaries need to examine not only the usability of their own platforms and how they can continue to be improved, but also how they are in practice used in scholarly research alongside other platforms and services. To do so, they cannot bring researchers into their usability labs, but instead they must engage researchers in their workplaces, in campus offices, labs, libraries, and dorms, and equally in off-campus homes and housing.

At the main information desks of research libraries, desktop workstations are used to test access and services to e-resources; while our researchers are living in a multi-device digital world of mobile, laptop, and tablet access. We will be examining parts of this scholarly ecosystem in the coming months and its impact on our users.

Tools to use:  Today, ProQuest (content provider) announced a partnership with Google Scholar to provide journal and conference connections through Google Scholar. The University of Pittsburgh University Library System provides this helpful Scholarly Communications glossary; and the graphic above is from the  101  Innovations in Scholarly Communications project and begins to congregate the new tools and workflows our researchers are using.

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Continuing Course

There should be a course for this! Open Access does not mean free. The Public Library of Science (PLoS) defines Open Access as “unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.” The Open Access movement founding is often attributed to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) and Peter Suber has written and presented in detail about Open Access. For the most informative and concise overview please read Open Access Overview by Peter Suber.

Nancy K. Herther in her recent post  Scholarly Publishing & Peer Review Face the Future explains the peer review issue with Open Access; and Joe Esposito enumerates some of the complex issues with publishers and Open Access in his post  The Context of Scientific Publishing.

If you prefer your explanation visually, Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen, at PHD Comics, explain Open Access for Open Access Week 2012.

Research methodologies

Open access and social networking readings seem to be coalescing around the “idea” of reading carefully!

The Pew Research Center documents that usage of social media is increasing.  Two other articles question whether social media or open access have any impact on scholarly communications.

Social Media and Its Impact on Medical Research by Phil Davis

Is Open Access a Cause or Effect? by Phil Davis

Read carefully! It’s all in the methodologies.


Encouraging data sharing

The PLoS One  report published September 26, 2014, outlining new data sharing policies, infrastructure and tools indicates that it is good to share.

NIH Prodding Makes Data Sharing More Common, Survey Finds
Report: “Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences” ByGenevieve Pham-Kanter, Darren E. Zinner, and Eric G. Campbell published in PLoS ONE

To learn more about accessing data in the Social Sciences, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is holding a series of open webinars October 6 -9, 2014:

ICPSR Data Fair 2014: Powering Sustainable Data Access

For many years, ICPSR has hosted several public-access research data archives that are sustained by federal and foundation funding. ICPSR’s 2014 Data Fair will feature webinars about many of these archives and collections, including an introduction to the National Archive of Data on Arts and Culture; the R-DAS collection at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive; two Gates Foundation-funded collections at the Resource Center for Minority Data; an orientation to the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program; and a Q & A about the Gates Foundation-funded Measures of Effective Teaching Longitudinal Database. You will find descriptions of these webinars in the Data Fair program. Other offerings will include a presentation about ICPSR’s current efforts to fund and achieve sustainable public-access data sharing models, including its newly launched collection known as openICPSR.

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan was released on July 24, 2014. [Plan]

The Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented their own Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES – Beta) as a repository for federally funded research.

In US Department of Energy Announces Public Access Plan (David Crotty, Aug. 4, 2014), copyright issues, text and data mining access, and use of data management principles are discussed. These issues and more will need to evolve through communication and practice.

Will the DOE Public Access Plan constitute “major shift in the scholarly publishing landscape” as Crotty writes?


Update: From DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

The Department of Energy’s Office of Science has issued a “Statement on Digital Data Management“<>.  The new requirements regarding management of digital research data will appear in funding solicitations and invitations issued by the Office of Science beginning Oct. 1, 2014.   Other Energy Department research offices will implement data management plan requirements within the next year.