Digital Scholarship: About ORCID

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

From https://members.orcid.org/outreach-resources

ORCID iDs ensure you get credit for ALL of your work!

Do you worry about getting credit for your research because your name is common or you have publications under multiple aliases? Do you struggle to keep track of all of your research outputs? Are you annoyed by having to enter the same information over and over in manuscript and grant submission systems?

To solve these problems, there’s now ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID is registry of unique identifiers for researchers and scholars that is open, non-proprietary, transparent, mobile, and community-based. ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier to DISTINGUISH YOU from all other researchers, AUTOMATICALLY LINKING your professional activities. For example,

  • Funding organizations like the U.S. NIH, Wellcome Trust, and Portuguese FCT are requesting ORCID iDs during grant submission and plan to use it to reduce the burden of grant submission
  • Publishers are collecting ORCID iDs during manuscript submission, and your ORCID iD becomes a part of your publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you
  • Universities and research institutes such as Harvard, Oxford, Michigan, Boston, NYU Langone Medical Center, and Texas A&M encourage ORCID adoption, and many are creating ORCID iDs for their faculty, postdocs, and graduate students!
  • Professional associations like the Society for Neuroscience and Modern Language Association are incorporating ORCID iDs into membership renewal

Over time, this collaborative effort will reduce redundant entry of biographical and bibliographical data into multiple systems. Your ORCID iD will belong to you throughout your scholarly career as a persistent identifier to distinguish you from other researchers and ensure consistent, reliable attribution of your work.

To get started:

1. Claim your free ORCID iD at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

Digital Scholarship: Have Your Say on Altmetrics!

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The National Information Standards Organization NISO has been working under an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant to “explore, identify, and advance standards and/or best practices related to a new suite of potential metrics” in scholarly publishing. This work focuses on “new assessment metrics, which include usage-based metrics, social media references, and network behavioral analysis. In addition, this project will explore potential assessment criteria for non-traditional research outputs, such as data sets, visualizations, software, and other applications.”  Read more about the NISO Alternative Assessment Metrics (Altmetrics) Initiative.

If your university of library is involved in research data services, this draft provides guidelines at every level. It explains the relationship between an article CrossRef DOI, a dataset DataCite DOI, and the scholar responsible with an ORCID ID. NEW! Alternative Outputs in Scholarly Communications: Data MetricsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

Our university has just become a member of ORCID. This draft will lead to discussion of the importance of machine readable persistent identifiers. NEW! Persistent Identifiers in Scholarly CommunicationsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

As universities and libraries have discussions about digital humanities, this draft provides lists of alternative scholarly output. NEW!  Alternative Outputs in Scholarly CommunicationsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

 

 

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Persistent Identifiers

Why we care and the cost of research
Water droplet with the earth in it
Image courtesy of Planeta Água

Libraries care about “discovery” and usage statistics to justify the high costs of scholarly resources. Researchers need to find sources that are available and use and attribute them ethically. Faculty researchers want to do their research, but need to get grants, publish research and be cited. In this age where “Google rules,”  student researchers want access to everything now. Government agencies and funders want to track return on investment for public funding of research. Businesses and citizens benefit from products of scholarly research. We all benefit from life saving drugs and procedures of medical research. We should all care about research. All of these entities are intertwined in our increasingly complex scholarly ecosystem.

The players

In this age of digital scholarship, the scholarly ecosystem involves players, systems and tools that need to be interoperable and machine-readable. Finding and accessing and reporting on research involves:

Understanding this ecosystem – and where researchers and librarians fit – is no easy task.

Persistent identifiers

If we think about a single scholarly article, the metadata that explains that piece of work and makes it discoverable and accessible and accountable may have identifiers that include the author(s), the format, the institution, the funder, the publisher, any restrictions to access, and the repository or web site where it resides. These pieces of metadata are all persistent identifiers of that piece of work.

This slide (provided from ORCID which is fast becoming a persistent name identifier for researchers and acts as a hub for all the other parts of the ecosystem) gives you a picture of how the interconnected players work in this ecosystem.

ORCID
What is ORCID?
ORCID is an open, non-profit, community-based effort to provide a registry of unique researcher identifiers and a transparent method of linking research activities and outputs to these identifiers. ORCID is unique in its ability to reach across disciplines, research sectors, and national boundaries and its cooperation with other identifier systems.

This blog post comes to you from http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1217-4465

More on the importance and players of the scholarly ecosystem next week.