Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Open Access – Continuing Course

There should be a course for this! Open Access does not mean free. The Public Library of Science (PLoS) defines Open Access as “unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.” The Open Access movement founding is often attributed to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) and Peter Suber has written and presented in detail about Open Access. For the most informative and concise overview please read Open Access Overview by Peter Suber.

Nancy K. Herther in her recent post  Scholarly Publishing & Peer Review Face the Future explains the peer review issue with Open Access; and Joe Esposito enumerates some of the complex issues with publishers and Open Access in his post  The Context of Scientific Publishing.

If you prefer your explanation visually, Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen, at PHD Comics, explain Open Access for Open Access Week 2012.

Research methodologies

Open access and social networking readings seem to be coalescing around the “idea” of reading carefully!

The Pew Research Center documents that usage of social media is increasing.  Two other articles question whether social media or open access have any impact on scholarly communications.

Social Media and Its Impact on Medical Research by Phil Davis

Is Open Access a Cause or Effect? by Phil Davis

Read carefully! It’s all in the methodologies.

 

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan

US Department of Energy Public Access Plan was released on July 24, 2014. [Plan]

The Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented their own Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES – Beta) as a repository for federally funded research.

In US Department of Energy Announces Public Access Plan (David Crotty, Aug. 4, 2014), copyright issues, text and data mining access, and use of data management principles are discussed. These issues and more will need to evolve through communication and practice.

Will the DOE Public Access Plan constitute “major shift in the scholarly publishing landscape” as Crotty writes?

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Update: From DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

The Department of Energy’s Office of Science has issued a “Statement on Digital Data Management“<http://science.energy.gov/funding-opportunities/digital-data-management/>.  The new requirements regarding management of digital research data will appear in funding solicitations and invitations issued by the Office of Science beginning Oct. 1, 2014.   Other Energy Department research offices will implement data management plan requirements within the next year.

 

Unigenitus cataloging project update

Three hundred early eighteenth-century French and Latin titles from the Albani collection, many of them the only exemplars in the United States, are now cataloged and available to researchers in Rare Books and Special Collections (214 Mullen). A sampling of their content may be found at the RBSC blog:   http://ascendonica.blogspot.com/

Nineteenth Century Collections Online: Primary Resources

Nineteenth Century Collections Online  (NCCO) provides full-text, fully searchable content from a wide range of primary sources for the “long” 19th century, 1789-1914. NCCO indexes the full text of books, newspapers, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, diaries, photographs, statistics, literature, government reports, treaties, and other kinds of documents in both Western and non-Western languages.  Released incrementally beginning in 2012, NCCO’s first four topical collections include: British Politics and Society; Asia and the West: Diplomacy and Cultural Exchange; British Theatre, Music, and Literature: High and Popular Culture; and European Literature, 1790-1840: The Corvey Collection.

 

Research Guides on Copyright

Confused by copyright?  You are not alone.  Two newly created research guides will be help you find the answers to your questions.  Copyright and Beyond (Basic Edition) is written with the undergraduate in mind and Copyright and Beyond (Advanced Edition) will be of assistance to graduate students and faculty.

New Research Guides on Shakespeare

Religious Studies and Humanities Services in Mullen Library present two new research guides on Shakespeare:  Shakespeare Studies: General and Shakespeare Studies: Performance.

The guides were created by Samantha Saporito, GLP and edited by Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services.  Faculty suggestions came from our Renaissance scholars Professors Michael Mack, Daniel Gibbons, Todd Lidh, Tobias Gregory, and Patrick Tuite.

If you have any questions about the guides or would like to suggest topics for new guides, please contact Kevin Gunn at extension 5088 or gunn@cua.edu.