Posts with the tag: Scholarly Communications

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Scholarly Ecosystem

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication graphic
101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication

The scholarly ecosystem gets more complicated every day. As this graphic depicts- click for larger size –  there are new tools being used by researchers every day to discover, access, and use scholarly research.

Until the Open Access movement gains ground, most researchers are beholden to content providers, services, and academic libraries for their access to scholarly research in e-content form. And that access could be better!

Roger Schonfeld writes of the stumbling blocks to this access in Dismantling the Stumbling Blocks that Impeded Researchers’ Access to e-Resources:

To adapt, publishers, libraries, and intermediaries need to examine not only the usability of their own platforms and how they can continue to be improved, but also how they are in practice used in scholarly research alongside other platforms and services. To do so, they cannot bring researchers into their usability labs, but instead they must engage researchers in their workplaces, in campus offices, labs, libraries, and dorms, and equally in off-campus homes and housing.

At the main information desks of research libraries, desktop workstations are used to test access and services to e-resources; while our researchers are living in a multi-device digital world of mobile, laptop, and tablet access. We will be examining parts of this scholarly ecosystem in the coming months and its impact on our users.

Tools to use:  Today, ProQuest (content provider) announced a partnership with Google Scholar to provide journal and conference connections through Google Scholar. The University of Pittsburgh University Library System provides this helpful Scholarly Communications glossary; and the graphic above is from the  101  Innovations in Scholarly Communications project and begins to congregate the new tools and workflows our researchers are using.

Fair Use Week 2015

Fair Use Week 2014 poster
Fair Use Week Poster 2015 from Harvard Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) encourages  libraries to celebrate Fair Use Week February 23 – 27 because “…fair use is employed on a daily basis by students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material.” http://www.arl.org/component/events/event/148

The first Fair Use Week was sponsored at Harvard in 2014.

Do you know Fair Use?

From the US Copyright Office:

The doctrine of fair use has developed through a substantial number of court decisions over the years and has been codified in section 107 of the copyright law.

Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair.

1.      The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes

2.      The nature of the copyrighted work

3.      The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole

4.      The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

The distinction between what is fair use and what is infringement in a particular case will not always be clear or easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.

US Copyright Law Code Sections 107 thru 118 codify the provisions of Fair Use.

Links you can use about Fair Use:

From The Catholic University of America see these links  Fair Use guidelines at CUA chart; CUA Copyright Guidelines; and Copyright Q & A’s from the CUA Libraries.

For librarians and researchers see these links: ARL Code of Best Practices in Fair Use and  Research Library Issues, no. 285 (2015): Special Issue on Copyright 

Fair Use Week blog chronicles case studies and frequently asked questions on Fair Use  from the Harvard Libraries Office of Scholarly Communication; and follow the  Fair Use Week web site from ARL and on Twitter via @fairuseweek and #fairuseweek2015.