Posts with the tag: Open Access

Introduction to Open Educational Resources, Attribution, and Use

Open Educational Resources Logo
“OER Logo Open Educational Resources” by Markus Büsges, Wikimedia Deutschland e. V. is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

As a student you may be familiar with the term, Open Educational Resources. Yet, it can be difficult to grasp the full breadth of the Open Educational Resources conversation. So what are Open Educational Resources and how can we use them with proper attribution?

UNESCO defines Open Educational Resources (OER) as “teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with intellectual property licenses that facilitate the free use, adaptation and distribution of resources.” OER differs from resources published under traditional copyright by allowing for much more flexibility in how the resource is retrieved and used. OER can come in a variety of formats including traditional textbooks or articles, videos and images, and even lesson plans or online courses. Essentially, OER are materials that are openly and freely available for use or re-use.

The cost-free nature of OER contributes to a more accessible and equitable academic environment. Using OER significantly reduces the cost of class materials for students and instructors alike. OER is also often distributed faster than resources that go through the formal publishing process. When researching a current topic, OER resources can often be a good source of timely information. When using less traditional OER, such as lesson plans or other course materials, OER allows for more flexibility and creativity in how a course is prepared, taught, and received. OER supports different learning styles as materials can be found in a variety of formats. And if a format is not available, the source content can be remixed and redesigned into something new due to the open nature of OER.

OER and the ‘Five Rs’
As a student, you may have previously used OER in your research, projects, or presentations. For example, you may have cited an open article in a research paper. Or maybe a professor of yours used an open textbook in your course. Maybe you’ve seen a classmate use open media in a presentation such as an image or audio licensed in the Creative Commons. All of these are great examples of how OER can be integrated into your current learning and academic life. Yet, before using OER, it is important to know about the permissions associated with the content. While all OER is ‘open’, some resources have more flexibility than others.

Most OER allows for some, or all, of the following permissions, known as the ‘Five Rs’ developed by David Wiley:

  • Retain – make, own, and control a copy of the resource (e.g. download and keep your own copy)
  • Revise – edit, adapt, and modify your copy of the resource (e.g., translate into another language)
  • Remix – combine your original or revised copy of the resource with other existing material to create something (e.g., make a mashup)
  • Reuse – use your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource publicly (e.g., on a website, in a presentation, in a class)
  • Redistribute – share copies of your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource with others (e.g., post a copy online or give one to a friend)

The license deed of each resource will provide information on the permissions you have when using the resource. When using an OER in your work, make sure you know what permissions the resource allows.

Showing Proper Attribution: The TASL Method
When working with OER you may use an attribution statement, which gives credit to the author and source. Yet, note that attribution statements are not the same as citations. Attributions are not academic and should not be used in place of a citation in a scholarly work. Attribution statements are a more informal method that gives credit to the author/source materials, whereas citations are a formal scholarly practice. If formally citing an OER resource for a paper or other academic work, refer to your field’s style manual such as MLA, Chicago, or APA for citation rules. Attributions should be used to provide credit when a formal citation is not required, for example, when using a Creative Commons image in a blog post.

Six books stacked on top of each other sit on a table
For example, this image of stacked books, would have the following attribution: “book stack” by ginnerobot is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

A helpful acronym for creating attribution statements is TASL. An ideal attribution includes all four components of TASL.

T = Title – what is the name of the resource?
A = Author – who created the resource?
S = Source – where can I find it?
L = License – how can I use it?

To properly attribute a resource, include the title, author and license with appropriate hyperlinks. Not all attribution statements will include all of this information. When creating an attribution, reasonable effort should be made to supply relevant information, yet attributions can still be valid without all of this information.

This attribution format applies to all types of OER, including textbooks. This open textbook, Legal Issues in Libraries and Archives, would have the following attribution: Legal Issues in Libraries and Archives by Ruth Dukelow and Michael Robak is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted. This attribution statement was sourced directly from the resource. Oftentimes OER creators include attribution statements within their resource to make attribution easier. A good practice when using OER is to look for author supplied attribution statements.

Build Your Own Attribution
If you don’t prefer the TASL method or cannot find an author supplied statement, tools like the Open Attribution Builder, can assist when creating attribution statements. Plug in the information you have about the resource being used and the tool will create a statement for you.

Open Attribution Builder
The Open Attribution Builder was created, and is maintained, by Open Washington.

For further details about attribution statements, visit the Best Practices for Attribution page on the Creative Commons wiki.

Image of the availability and resource type facets in the CU Libraries catalog
Screenshot of the facets feature within the CU Libraries catalog.

OER @ CU Libraries
When sourcing OER, ensure the resources you are using truly are OER, and of good quality, by visiting trusted open-source repositories. Visit our Open Educational Resources Guide to view lists of OER and websites related to your field of study. One great resource for finding open-source textbooks is the Open Textbook Library. This resource is maintained by the Open Education Network, a community of higher education institutions and educators creating inclusive educational environments through OER.

You can also use the library catalog to search for OER. Limit your results to open access resources by using facets. Facets are helpful tools that further define your search results list. Facets are seen on the left side of the results screen in our catalog. Navigating the world of OER can feel overwhelming at times. Consider using these tools and tips next time you are conducting research or working on a project. If you have additional questions about OER, email us or connect with a subject librarian.

 

Faculty Perspectives: Open Textbooks in the Classroom and Funding Opportunities

Join the Washington Research Library Consortium Textbook Affordability Working Group for a brief introduction to open textbooks and a panel discussion featuring two faculty members who teach with them.

One of our presenters will be CU’s Dr. Chelsea Kelly, Assistant Professor of Sociology, who will share her experiences using an open textbook for her SOC 202 Research Methods class.

First-time attendees who are course instructors or faculty will have the opportunity to earn a $200 stipend by posting a review of an open textbook!

Date: Wednesday, December 1st, 12:30 pm – 1:20 pm

Agenda:

Welcome – Introduction to Open Textbooks and Faculty Funding Opportunity

    • Jenise Overmier, Assistant Professor, Research & Instruction Librarian, Marymount University

Faculty Discussion Panel

    • Dr. Chelsea Kelly, Professor of sociology, Catholic University

    • Bill Hanff, Professor in Digital Media, University of DC

Moderator:

    • Meghan Kowalski, Outreach and Reference Librarian, University of DC

Moderator(s)
    • Meghan Kowalski, Outreach and Reference Librarian, University of DC
    • Jenise Overmier, Assistant Professor, Research & Instruction Librarian, Marymount University

Register today! – https://forms.gle/Qdc8eVZigA7Y9tY68 (Zoom link will be sent the day before the event to registered attendees)

Learn more about the event and Open Textbooks at https://open.wrlc.org

Questions? Contact Kevin Gunn (gunn@cua.edu), CU’s TAWG rep.

Open Access Week: It Matters How We Open Knowledge

The theme for this year’s International Open Access Week (October 25-31) is, “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.” The notion of structural equity is a dominant issue in today’s geopolitics. Open Access Week was created by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) for the academic and research community to “learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.”

A Quick Refresher: What is Open Access?

Open Access refers to “the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the right to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*). See this video for a fuller explanation:

 

Open Science

The theme of Open Knowledge focusing on structural equity coincides with UNESCO’s recent Recommendation on Open Science report. This report is the first framework for establishing global standards for OA. The goal is to have research that is truly open, to “embrace a diversity of knowledge, practices, workflows, languages, research outputs and research topics that support the needs and epistemic pluralism of the scientific community as a whole, diverse research communities and scholars, as well as the wider public and knowledge holders […].”

UNESCO will adopt this report in November 2021. Some salient quotes from the report underscore the importance of this document:

Open Science should embrace a diversity of knowledge, practices, workflows, languages, research outputs and research topics that support the needs and epistemic pluralism of the scientific community as a whole, diverse research communities and scholars, as well as the wider public and knowledge holders beyond the traditional scientific community, including Indigenous Peoples and local communities, and social actors from different countries and regions, as appropriate. 

And,

Open Science should play a significant role in ensuring equity among researchers from developed and developing countries, enabling fair and reciprocal sharing of scientific inputs and outputs and equal access to scientific knowledge to both producers and consumers of knowledge regardless of location, nationality, race, age, gender, income, socio-economic circumstances, career stage, discipline, language, religion, disability, ethnicity or migratory status or any other grounds.

SPARC has been at the forefront of Open Access since 1998. In its 2021 Update: SPARC Landscape Analysis and Roadmap for Action, it argues for fostering equitable open science practices. SPARC gives one example that has been around for years but not known in the larger scientific community:

The weight accorded to leading journals because of their impact factors (IF) has given these journals the incentive to operate a covert science policy: publishers and editors have incentives to maintain or raise their IF, and this leads them to prioritize publishing articles that are likely to be widely cited. This means they will prefer to publish articles in areas that are “fashionable” and of wide interest, and this focus of the leading publishers in turn affects funding and the priorities of funding bodies…. Unfashionable disciplines and approaches (like those affecting rare diseases or people in disadvantaged communities) are structurally disadvantaged by these dynamics.

The report outlines trends—rising market concentration, increased bundling, and inclusive access—that limit student choices and widen the usage of monitoring technologies, and further demonstrate that OA is being fought on a number of fronts, including academic freedom. See the activities planned for Open Access Week 2021.

Resources

OASIS. Developed at SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library, Openly Available Sources Integrated Search (OASIS) is a search tool for discovering open content. OASIS currently searches open content from 114 different sources (66 sources in 2018) and contains 440,269 records.

Open Science video. What is Open Science? See this video created by the Knowledge Network for University Libraries (The Netherlands).

The Company of Biologists. The Editors-in-Chief of Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology share their thoughts on Open Access publishing in this video.

UNESCO, Open Educational Resources (OER).

Open Access Week: Getting to Know OA

What is Open Access? The Berlin Declaration states:

Open access contributions must satisfy two conditions: The author(s) and right holder(s) of such contributions grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship ….

Essentially, knowing your rights as an author and deciding the way you will dispense your work (license) are the two main factors in determining the degree of open access. Understanding what is Open Access can be daunting. For a detailed explanation of what OA is, what it is not, and popular myths debunked, consult the guru of OA, Peter Suber:

Open Access Overview

http://legacy.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm

A Field Guide to Misunderstandings About Open Access

http://legacy.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/04-02-09.htm

More information about OA can be found at the Open Access Directory which is maintained by the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at Simmons College. The Directory has a compendium of fact lists on a variety of topics related to OA.

Recent articles

Recent developments illustrate the shifting perspectives on OA. These articles published this week reflect this changing dynamic.

Oya Y. Rieger, Roger C. Schonfeld. Beyond Innovation: Emerging Meta-Frameworks for Maintaining an Open Scholarly Infrastructure. Ithaka. October 21, 2019.

Byron Russell. The Future of Open Access Business Models: APCs Are Not the Only Way. Scholarly Kitchen. October 23, 2019.

Ann Michael. Ask the Chefs: The Future of OA business models. October 24, 2019.

About Journals

Virginia research libraries endorse MIT framework for publisher contracts. Virginia Tech News. October 24, 2019.

Colleen Flaherty. Where research meets profits. Inside Higher Ed. October 23, 2019.

Ann Michael. Open Access business models. Scholarly Kitchen. October 24, 2019.

Eanna Kelly. Research organization releases publishing costs to highlight the challenge of going to full open access. Science Business. October 24, 2019.

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship. September 5, 2018. Free documentary on the problem of paywalls for journals.

About Books

About Data

Briony Fane, Paul Ayris, Mark Hahnel, Iain Hrynaszkiewicz, Grace Baynes, and Emily Farrell. State of Open Data Report 2019. Digital Science. October 24, 2019.  A short video explains the report’s findings: https://www.digital-science.com/blog/news/the-state-of-open-data-2019/

SPARC Open Data Factsheet.

About Open Education Resources (OER)

Anita Walz,  Assistant Director for Open Education and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech Libraries, has created an information handout Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources.

 

 

Film Screening: Paywall: The Business of Scholarship

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google.” – Website

Join us for a panel discussion of journal subscriptions and open access alternatives.

Panelists:

Dr. Binh Tran – Department of Biomedical Engineering
Dr. Lilla Kopár – Department of English
Kevin Gunn – Libraries

Wednesday, October 23, 2019  2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Mullen Library, May Gallery

Light refreshments will be served.

 

Sponsored by the Catholic University Libraries & the University Honors Program

For questions or accommodations, please contact Kevin Gunn: gunn@cua.edu

Open Access Week: Open For Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge

Open Access Week (October 21 – 27, 2019) begins today! For those who are unfamiliar with the concept of Open Access, the term refers to “the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the right to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*).

For a current understanding, see the following video:

 

The Catholic University of America Libraries is hosting a number of events this week:

Open Access Week Events

ICYMI: Avoiding Predatory Publishers: What Students and Faculty Should Know Before Publishing Their Research

As a graduate student or new faculty member seeking an academic position, tenure, or promotion, you will need to establish a scholarly presence and build your curriculum vitae. A building block in this process is publishing in quality academic journals (subscription-based or open access).

This webinar will explore the expanding problem of predatory publishing practices and how to avoid becoming a victim. Guidance will be provided for identifying and selecting the right journal publisher that reflects your values. Understanding your rights as an author will be discussed as well. Practical tips and suggestions on navigating this complicated process are provided.

This webinar was originally held on October 24th, 2018 as part of the library’s Open Access Week Program. Here is the recording:

 

If you have any questions or would like a research consultation, please contact:

Kevin Gunn
Coordinator of Digital Scholarship
314B Mullen Library
gunn@cua.edu
202-319-5504

Open Access Week: Some Current Trends

This week is Open Access Week (October 22nd-28th, 2018)! A lot has happened in Open Access in the past year so I will try to encapsulate the latest trends. Why care about Open Access? Our former CUA colleague, Marian Taliaferro, Digital Scholarship Librarian at the College of William and Mary explains why in 5 Reasons You Should Care about Open Access.

For those who are unfamiliar with the concept of Open Access, the term refers to “the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*).  The Open Access movement has been around for years but the public declaration began in 2002 with the Budapest Statement on Open Access Publishing (2002; 10th anniversary statement in 2012), followed closely by the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing (2003) and the Berlin Declaration on Open Access (2003).

For a current understanding, see the following video:

 

 

New Publishing Models?

The Author Publications Charges (APC) model is not working. Other transactional models need to be explored. Sven Fund writes in the Scholarly Kitchen about the evolving structure of open access author pay models to one where there are still operational challenges to open access. OA2020 is another initiative that has gained prominence recently. OA2020 advocates for accelerating the change to an Open Access business model. OA2020’s mission is to eventually move subscription journals to an open access model based on a paper published by the Max Planck Digital Library in 2015 demonstrating that there is enough money in the journal publishing ecosystem to permit a transition to open access. Written by Ralf Schimmer, Kai Geschuhn and Andreas Vogler and titled “Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access,” the paper outlines the steps the global community would need to take for the transition.

Institutions who want to be involved in the OA2020 can sign an “Expression of Interest” and scholars can advocate at their home insitutions.  College and Research Libraries News has an article focusing on U.S. academic institutions. Rachael Samberg, Richard A. Schneider, Anneliese Taylor, and Michael Wolfe, in their article What’s Behind OA2020?, ask why only five U.S. insitutions have signed on so far.

Another point Fund makes that is worth considering pertains to academia and libraries in particular:

The other key element, at least in some parts of the world, is the internal structure of the library. It not only follows the interests of faculty and students, but (at least in Europe) it also quite often has its internal professional rules. The slow dissemination of OA is a vivid example of how stability in the academy comes with a lot of disadvantages. Libraries find it hard to shift budgets more radically, in part caused by the fact that they became addicted to easy solutions like the Big Deal, that in turn tie up a large part of their budgets. APC funds fit the scheme: They are easy to decide upon, and their existence appeases those advocates on campus that would like to see more alternatives.

There is a push for having all research papers funded by funders made open access. In Europe this move was announced on September 4th by Robert-Jan Smits, the Open Access Envoy of the European Commission, and Marc Schiltz, the President of Science Europe.  Plan S is to ensure that by 2020 all research papers arising from European funding are made open access immediately on publication. An interview with Robert-Jan Smits outlines some of the elements of the plan, including problems with Plan S — pushback from publishers AND researchers, no perceived role of institutional repositories, and contrary to principles of academic freedom — are some of the issues discussed. Plan S is not the first call for changing research assessment. The Leiden Manifesto and the UK report “The Metric Tide” were both released in 2015 and essentially went nowhere. A paper on the Leiden proposal titled “The Leiden Manifesto Under Review: What Libraries Can Learn From It” was published in 2017.

Sally Rumsey, head of Scholarly Communications & RD at the Bodleian Libraries at Oxford University, has noticed a change in the researchers themselves:

I detect a more subtle culture change that is happening at the grass roots i.e. by the researchers themselves. To disseminate your research in the past, it was necessary to follow the standard traditional publishing route – publish in a respectable journal and those people who have paid can read your paper – plus you can post a few copies to your mates. Today, in order to get your research noticed and ‘out there,’ there are many more options available. The ‘standard’ route is being enhanced, and many researchers don’t want to be confined to a single model, or to limited sharing of their work. Open Access: reflections on change. Many are taking advantage of the diversity that the internet offers: how research findings are presented and distributed, such as articles with integrated data, open commentary to published findings, new models of peer review and comments, registered reports, and rapid publication. Add to this the immediacy of promotion by social media, academic networks, and altmetrics scores that can give rapid indication of one type of impact. In some disciplines, particularly the sciences, authors are becoming frustrated with continuing barriers to access and re-use as they habitually adopt a more open stance. There remain some areas of confusion and mistrust of OA, but I detect a definite sense of acceptance of and shift to ‘open.’

Rumsey goes on to write that libraries have set up services for supporting open access research initiatives. ORCIDs are one such attempt in the discovery and dissemenation of research through the use of unique identifiers. Another article from the Scholarly Kitchen focuses on libraries: Libraries Face a Future of Open Access. Read the comments too!

 

Open Source Platform for Data by Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee is working on an open source platform for data called “Solid”. One response to his work is titled “A Critical Review of the Solid Platform.”

 

Open Educational Resources

UNESCO defines Open Education Resources as:

any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them. OERs range from textbooks to curricula, syllabi, lecture notes, assignments, tests, projects, audio, video and animation.

OER is moving forward albeit slowly.  A year-end article by Mike Silagadze in EdSurge talks about 2017 being a pivotal point in OER adoption: “OER Had Its Breakthrough in 2017. Next Year, It Will Become an Essential Teaching Tool.” He writes that that three key tests will need to be met: OER content quality needs to improve, OER needs bells and whistles, and OER needs to be easier to find and adopt.

For more information on this movement in general check out these sites:

SPARC’s Open Education

UNESCO Open Educational Resources

Affordable Course Content and Open Educational Resources SPEC Kit (2016)

OASIS – Openly Available Sources Integrated Search (OASIS) is a search tool for making the discovery of open content easier. OASIS currently searches from 66 different sources and contains over 164,000 records. OASIS is a project developed at SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library with consulting from Alexis Clifton, SUNY OER Services Executive Director.

 

Open Data and Academic Institutions

Christine Borgman, Distinguished Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA, gave a lecture on October 9, 2018 titled “Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship: Universities at the Privacy Frontier,” at Harvard University. Borgman sees the growth and availability of digital data resources collected by universities as a balancing act between academic freedom, stewardship, trust, privacy, and confidentiality, on one hand, and the value of using this data for science and commercial ends:

Researchers provide open access to their data as a condition for obtaining grant funding or publishing results in journals, leading to an explosion of available scholarly content. Universities have automated many aspects of teaching, instruction, student services, libraries, personnel management, building management, and finance, leading to a profusion of discrete data about the activities of individuals. Many of these data, both research and operational, fall outside privacy regulations such as HIPAA, FERPA, and PII. Universities see great value of these data for learning analytics, faculty evaluation, strategic decisions, and other sensitive matters. Commercial entities, governments, and private individuals also see value in these data and are besieging universities with requests for access.

 

 

Borgman, C. L. (2017, November). Open Data, Trust, and Stewardship: Universities at the Privacy Frontier. The 10th Annual BCLT Privacy Lecture, Berkeley, CA. Retrieved from https://berkeley.app.box.com/s/v35vb4gee2iloxkxeu94l7a3it4wbx2y

Borgman, C. L. (2018). Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship: Universities at the Privacy Frontier. Berkeley Technology Law Journal33(2), 287–336. http://btlj.org/data/articles2018/vol33/33_2/Borgman_Web.pdf

 

Advocating for Open Access

There are a number of ways to promote Open Access:

1. Join The Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) and advocate for OA at your insitution.

2. Publish in Open Access journals. How? See the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).

3. Advocacy Organizations for OA. Worldwide directory.

4. UNC Health Sciences Library: Open Access and Scholarly Communications: Advocating for OA

Open Access Week Events: What is ORCID?

Open Access Week is October 22 – 28, 2018. Open Access “is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*). As part of Open Access Week, CUA Libraries is offering a number of initiatives.

What is ORCID? As a faculty member or a graduate student, you should be establishing a scholarly presence and managing your scholarly reputation. Have you ever wondered:

  • if you have a common name or publish under various aliases (e.g. John Smith and J. Smith) whether you are getting credit for your research?
  • how to save time by integrating your manuscript and grant submission workflows (that is, by not having to enter your same information over and over again)?
  • how you can keep track of your scholarly output?

The solution is having a persistent digital identifier such an ORCID ID. Acquiring an ORCID account is necessary for professional advancement. In fact, many journals require that authors have ORCID accounts for manuscript submissions. Watch this video for a quick overview.

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

ORCID stands for the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. With an ORCID ID, you can integrate your research over various platforms such as Kudos, Mendeley, Scopus, Web of Science, and Humanities Commons. For example, ScienceOpen uses ORCID ID with “enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.”

Furthermore, funding organizations like the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health: SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae are requiring ORCID ID.

 

Publishers are collecting ORCID IDs during manuscript submission (e.g. Taylor and Francis), scholars are using it in Open Access platforms like PLOS (Public Library of Open Science), and even subscription databases like the Modern Language Association International Bibliography use ORCID IDs to distinguish scholars.

As part of Open Access Week (October 22-28th, 2018), CUA Libraries will have tables set up in various buildings on campus for students and faculty to sign up for an ORCID account.

  • MONDAY October 22nd
    Pangborn Portico
  • TUESDAY October 23rd
    McMahon Foyer
  • FRIDAY October 26th
    Mullen Library

All times are 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Drop by for 30 seconds and we will sign you up!

Your ORCID ID will belong to you throughout your scholarly career so acquire this unique identifier to showcase your research and ensure proper attribution of your work. If you cannot make the table sessions, follow these instructions in getting started:

1. Claim your free ORCID ID at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

 

Need help or have questions? Please contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship (gunn@cua.edu).

Open Access Week Events (October 23rd – 29th)

Open Access Week is October 23 – 29, 2017. Open Access “is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*). As part of Open Access Week, CUA Libraries is offering a number of intiatives.

What is ORCID? As a faculty member or a graduate student, you should be establishing a scholarly presence and managing your scholarly reputation. Have you ever wondered:

  • if you have a common name or publish under various aliases (e.g. John Smith and J. Smith) whether you are getting credit for your research?
  • how to save time by integrating your manuscript and grant submission workflows (that is, by not having to enter your same information over and over again)?
  • how you can keep track of your scholarly output?

The solution is having a persistent digital identifier such an ORCID iD. Acquiring an ORCID account is necessary for professional advancement. In fact, many journals require that authors have ORCID accounts for manuscript submissions.  Watch this video for a quick overview.

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

ORCID stands for the Open Researcher and Contributor ID.  With an ORCID iD, you can integrate your research over various platforms such as Kudos, Mendeley, Scopus, Web of Science, and Humanities Commons. For example, ScienceOpen uses ORCID iD with “enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.”

Furthermore, funding organizations like the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health: SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae are requiring ORCID iD.

Publishers are collecting ORCID iDs during manuscript submission (e.g. Taylor and Francis), scholars are using it in Open Access platforms like PLOS (Public Library of Open Science), and even subscription databases like the Modern Language Association International Bibliography use ORCID iDs to distinguish scholars.

As part of Open Access Week (October 23-29th, 2017), CUA Libraries will have tables set up in various buildings on campus for students and faculty to sign up for an ORCID account.

  • MONDAY October 23rd
    Pangborn Portico
  • TUESDAY October 24th
    Hannan Foyer
  • WEDNESDAY October 25th
    Caldwell Lobby
  • THURSDAY October 26th
    McMahon Foyer
  • FRIDAY October 27th
    Mullen Library

 

All times are 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Drop by for 30 seconds and we will sign you up!

Your ORCID iD will belong to you throughout your scholarly career so acquire this unique identifier to showcase your research and ensure proper attribution of your work. If you cannot make the table sessions, follow these instructions in getting started:

1. Claim your free ORCID iD at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using our automated import wizards

3. Use your ORCID when you apply for grants, submit publications, or share your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

 

Need help or have questions? Please contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship (gunn@cua.edu).


As a graduate student or new faculty member seeking an academic position, acquiring tenure, or being promoted, you will need to establish a scholarly presence and build your curriculum vitae. A building block in this process is publishing in quality academic journals (subscription-based or open access). Once your article has been accepted (oh joy!) for publication, publishers will require that you sign an author’s agreement. Do you know what it is you are signing? Navigating the scholarly journal terrain can be daunting task in finding the right journals for your article, neogtiating your rights with the publisher, identifying (and avoiding!) predatory journals, and determining if an open access journal meets your needs. This webinar will offer a general overview of each topic with useful hints and suggestions on navigating this complicated process.

author rights addendum

When: Wednesday, October 25th, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST

Where: Online (https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189)

Presenter: Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship, The Catholic University of America Libraries

Questions: Contact Kevin Gunn, 202-319-5504 or gunn@cua.edu

 

Connection details:

Please join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/110395189

You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (872) 240-3212

Access Code: 110-395-189

First GoToMeeting? Try a test session: http://link.gotomeeting.com/email-welcome

Attendance is limited to 26 people.