New Mullen Library Exhibits, Spring 2023

Sit Down and Stand Up: Women of Action in the Civil Rights Movement is on display in the Mullen Library Lobby near the 1st Floor Computer Lab. Although the effects of the Civil Rights Movement truly came to light in the 1950s when speeches and protests were finally heard and acted on by the American people and government, people of color were standing up for their rights long before the middle of the century and continue to do so today. Visit the exhibit to learn more about the tenacious women who fought for their own and others’ civil rights over the past century.

The exhibit Windows & Mirrors: The Importance of Diversity in Children’s Literature is on view on the 2nd floor of Mullen Library in the Main Reading Room.  This offering shines a spotlight on the importance of exploring diversity in children’s literature and how using such works in education can open children up to better understanding themselves and the world around them. Our Juvenile Collection features many books that show diverse stories and many that are created by authors and illustrators that come from underrepresented groups. Visit this exhibit to learn more about some of these works!

Adopt a Book Grants now available to faculty

Textbook affordability continues to be a serious concern for our students. What is the result of the unchecked commercial textbook publishing market? Most students will never purchase the required textbook-directly informing student success, retention and equity in the classroom. Open Education Resources (OER) for higher education have made significant progress over the last few decades and peer-reviewed textbooks and instructional material are now routinely and successfully used by instructors at fellow research universities across the country, including your own!

Please join the WRLC’s Textbook Affordability Working Group (TAWG) on Tuesday, January 31st at 12:00 PM to learn more about the faculty stipend program in which workshop attendees can earn $200 for writing a review of a textbook in the Open Textbook Library.

In addition, the WRLC is excited to launch the Open@WRLC Adopt Grant Call for Applications. The $2,000 OER Adopt grant is intended to support faculty who wish to replace (adopt) a commercial textbook with OER. Those who “adopt” a resource will be using existing resource(s) as-is or with minimal editorial changes. Grantees will be expected to adopt the selected material in Fall 2023. Join us to learn more about this new opportunity and how you can promote OER advocacy on your campus!

Register today! – https://forms.gle/e6nfFEGnnXn9uofH6 (Zoom link will be sent the day before the event to registered attendees)

Learn more about the event and Open Textbooks at https://open.wrlc.org

Studying Mullen Library Itself

As we approach the 100th anniversary of the construction of Mullen Library in 2028, Facilities has hired the architectural firm SmithGroup to:

  • make a preliminary study of the existing conditions & history of Mullen Library;
  • assess the space needs for collections & library services; and
  • rough out some options & pricing for possible future renovation work.

Later this spring, the firm will organize focus group meetings with stakeholders on campus to discuss space needs for library collections and services. By the end of the summer, the architects are expected to develop some test fits and share some rough options for future renovations for the university to consider.

As one of the first steps in their study, during the winter intersession SmithGroup took a 3D scan of Mullen Library. As of today, their reference points are still mounted throughout the inside and even outside of the building awaiting confirmation that all the data collected is good. The interior scanning was primarily done by walking the building while wearing the scanning apparatus, but the exterior scan and transition to the inside was done by tripod mounted scanners. These scans will allow for the most exact architectural drawings of Mullen ever done and will help the firm experiment with and mock up any proposed renovations to the building.

University Research Day 2023 Call for Abstracts

As a member of the 2023 University Research Day Committee, I would like to share the following announcement with you:

University Research Day at Catholic University is back! The deadline for abstract submission for University Research Day 2023 is Jan. 24, 2023.

All members of the Catholic University community are encouraged to share their work by submitting an application. Research has a broad meaning and can include anything that falls under ‘scholarly work.’ Some examples include:

  • a scholarly paper
  • a collaborative project with a faculty member
  • a recent presentation given at a professional meeting
  • a dramatic or musical performance
  • a display of art

URD will be in-person with in-person presentations and a poster session on our DC campus. All presentations will also be pre-recorded so that the global community can access them virtually. Remote students, faculty and staff (e.g., online programs, at the Rome Center, and Tucson) can participate in the virtual poster and oral presentations. Students, faculty and staff on campus can participate in-person as well as share their research virtually.

URD is an opportunity to share one’s scholarship in a way that ensures accessibility to everyone — even those unfamiliar with the subject matter. Abstracts should reflect this, written with clear, non-technical language that is geared for ALL people. Examples of past selected abstracts are available here. Submitted abstracts will be judged by members of the URD Planning Committee and selected presenters will be notified by email.

Look for more information on social media from our hashtag, #CUatResearchDay and from this website including important dates, the format for the presentations, and the link to the application form. In addition, the names of the current planning committee members are listed on the website, should you have specific questions. See University Research Day 2022 presentations here.

Abstracts: If you are interested in presenting a paper, poster, or interactive demonstration, please complete the abstract submission form. Abstracts must be received by January 24, 2023 at 5 p.m., to be considered. Submissions received after that date will not be reviewed.

Elizabeth Edinger and Chris Raub
URD 2023 Co-Chairs

Blueprint for the Future?

Photo by Alex Wong on Unsplash

Storytelling is a skill that everyone can develop. In The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman, Carmine Gallo “reveals the communication and leadership secrets of the Amazon founder, showing readers how to sharpen their writing, storytelling and communication skills to build the company or career of their dreams.” Once you are finished, check out the rest of our Popular Reading collection. Titles range from commentary, fiction, historical fiction, mystery, suspense, non-fiction, current affairs, science, social issues, and politics.

Our collection is on the first floor of Mullen Library in the Reference Reading Room.

Hold your cursor over the Title to see a short description of the book, or click to view the catalog record. The status of the book is shown beside the call number.

Title Author Status
The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman Gallo, Carmine
Going Rogue Evanovich, Janet
The Age of Resilience: Reimagining Existence on a Rewilding Earth Rifkin, Jeremy
Egypt’s Golden Couple: When Akhenaten and Nefertiti Were Gods on Earth Darnell, John & Darnell, Colleen
Now Is Not the Time to Panic Wilson, Kevin
Before Your Memory Fades Kawaguchi, Toshikazu
The Future Is Analog: How to Create a More Human World Sax, David
The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times Obama, Michelle
Lost to the World: A Memoir of Faith, Family, and Five Years in Terrorist Captivity Taseer, Shahbaz
The Number Ones: Twenty Chart-topping Hits That Reveal the History of Pop Music Breihan, Tom
Tracers in the Dark: The Global Hunt for the Crime Lords of Cryptocurrency Greenberg, Andy

For more great information from CUA Libraries, follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Mullen Library Facebook; @CUAlibraries

Collaborative Collections and Shared Print: Libraries Working Together for a Better Future

In 2022, most libraries face the same two significant realities: decreasing budgets and finite space. Librarians are tasked with providing diverse populations of library users with the information resources they need and want (for ex., books, journals, scores, manuscripts, etc.) within a physical space that gets more crowded with each successive year.

It is not surprising, then, that discussions around collaborative collections and shared print have been on the rise for the past several years.

Books being digitized
Gerd Altmann via Pixabay.com

What are Collaborative Collections and Shared Print?

In the simplest sense, a collaborative collection is “the combined holdings of a group of libraries.”1 These collections do not just provide a list of all of the holdings of the participating libraries, but rather truly work to combine the collections. As this is done, any duplicate resources are reduced from the collection and as libraries consider future resource purchases the collaborative collection must first be consulted to make sure there are no duplicates. Having a collaborative collection can increase the scale of one’s collection while leaving items such as the status of ownership, collection access, and what resources are shown in the collection to those managing it.2

While some of these collaborative collections focus on online resources, there has been a rise in the amount of shared print programs as well. Through these programs, libraries work together to create a collection of their print resources in a physical or digitized format thus allowing patrons to access monographs, serials, and periodicals from multiple libraries. Shared print programs have a focus on “access and preservation, and an emphasis on partnerships and shared collection management.”3 The move toward shared print programs has helped to drive the growth of collaborative collections as the benefits of sharing collections have become more evident. 

Catholic University has seen these benefits first hand through our involvement in the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC). We work together with several other partner universities in the area to maintain a collaborative collection of over 22 million items that can be found at libraries throughout the area as well as at a shared storage facility in Maryland. With this, Catholic University patrons can borrow print resources from any of our partner universities to have them delivered directly to campus through the Consortium Loan Service (CLS). The Coordinated Collections Committee (CCC) of the WRLC, composed of librarians from nine academic institutions, collaboratively acquire and share some print and e-resources, at a substantial financial savings for each individual library. Consequently, each individual library has more discretion to purchase and share unique and specialized publications.

Washington Research Library Consortium
Washington Research Library Consortium

The Benefits 

The biggest benefit of collaborative collections for libraries and patrons alike is the increased access to resources. As these collections are created and duplicate works are weeded out, individual library collections become rather distinct from one another. The collaborative collection is then built to contain a well rounded collection with diverse and unique works within it.4 This optimizes the access to resources that patrons receive while allowing the library to then spend money on contributing more unique resources to the collaborative collection rather than spending money on resources that one of their partner libraries may already have.

The freedom that individual libraries retain within these collaborative collections is another benefit. Libraries working within one of these collections will follow standards for collection development and organization to best work with its partner libraries, but the libraries are still able to make decisions on how their individual resources are organized and retained within their physical space and are thus able to curate them to their specific community. Being able to keep individual communities in mind while still working within a collaborative collection and managing the collection as a group, really highlights the “shared goal of preservation and access” that these collections were created with.5 

Growth of Collaborative Collections

As collaborative collections and shared print initiatives continue to develop, librarians are excited by the possibilities for sharing resources more broadly, diversifying collections, and reaching users around the world. The Internet Archive, the Rosemont Shared Print Alliance, and HathiTrust have introduced innovative initiatives that are leading the way in exploring the potential for shared collections.

Catholic University is in the process of becoming a member of HathiTrust. HathiTrust is a collaboration of academic and research institutions that offers over a million digitized titles. It is fully funded by its member institutions so it is able to stay focused on the goals of preservation and access. It includes the digitally preserved collections of over 200 libraries and has made 40 percent of the collection available to the public which is the “broadest access legally possible” due to copyright constraints.6 HathiTrust can be fully integrated into a member library’s systems allowing patrons and library staff to take advantage of its offerings. It also offers tools for text analysis such as worksets and a separate analytics site to accomplish objectives such as text mining. Users are then able to benefit from this highly diverse collection and access titles online easily while libraries are able to preserve their print collections to allow users to engage with them for the foreseeable future.

HathiTrust
HathiTrust

In the Future

Going forward, collaborative collections and shared print are likely to become increasingly more popular and seen within many library’s systems. Libraries are continuing to develop innovative processes to compliment these collections and allow patrons greater access. Controlled digital lending (CDL), circulating a temporary digital copy of a print book while removing the physical copy from circulation, is one such process that has become an emerging trend.7 With the rise of such collections and lending processes, patrons will be able to access more works than ever before while libraries will be able to preserve and more widely share their collections. Libraries will be tasked with developing best practices for such collections and emerging processes but the work put in now will benefit libraries and patrons for years to come.

References 

  1. Lavoie, B., Dempsey, L., & Malpas, C. (2020). Reflections on collective collections. College & Research Libraries, 81(6). https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.81.6.981
  2. Ibid.
  3. Fulkerson, N., & Weltin, H. (2021). Old texts, new networks: HathiTrust and the future of shared print. In L. McAllister and S. Laster (Eds.), Transforming print: Collection development and management for our connected future (pp. 69). Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
  4. See note 1 above.
  5. Fulkerson & Weltin, 2021, p. 67.
  6. Ibid., p. 71.
  7. Association of Research Libraries. (2020, July 1). Association of research libraries signs statement in support of controlled digital lending. https://www.arl.org/news/association-of-research-libraries-signs-statement-in-support-of-controlled-digital-lending/

University Research Day 2023 Call for Abstracts

As a member of the 2023 University Research Day Committee, I would like to share the following announcement with you:

University Research Day at Catholic University is back! The deadline for abstract submission for University Research Day 2023 is Jan. 24, 2023.

All members of the Catholic University community are encouraged to share their work by submitting an application. Research has a broad meaning and can include anything that falls under ‘scholarly work.’ Some examples include:

  • a scholarly paper
  • a collaborative project with a faculty member
  • a recent presentation given at a professional meeting
  • a dramatic or musical performance
  • a display of art

URD will be in-person with in-person presentations and a poster session on our DC campus. All presentations will also be pre-recorded so that the global community can access them virtually. Remote students, faculty and staff (e.g., online programs, at the Rome Center, and Tucson) can participate in the virtual poster and oral presentations. Students, faculty and staff on campus can participate in-person as well as share their research virtually.

URD is an opportunity to share one’s scholarship in a way that ensures accessibility to everyone — even those unfamiliar with the subject matter. Abstracts should reflect this, written with clear, non-technical language that is geared for ALL people. Examples of past selected abstracts are available here. Submitted abstracts will be judged by members of the URD Planning Committee and selected presenters will be notified by email.

Look for more information on social media from our hashtag, #CUatResearchDay and from this website including important dates, the format for the presentations, and the link to the application form. In addition, the names of the current planning committee members are listed on the website, should you have specific questions. See University Research Day 2022 presentations here.

Abstracts: If you are interested in presenting a paper, poster, or interactive demonstration, please complete the abstract submission form. Abstracts must be received by January 24, 2023 at 5 p.m., to be considered. Submissions received after that date will not be reviewed.

Elizabeth Edinger and Chris Raub
URD 2023 Co-Chairs

Life Is Hard

Gene Brutty at Unsplash

In Life Is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way, Kieran Setiya writes a deeply personal and thought-provoking book, not only drawing on ancient and modern philosophy, but fiction, history, memoir, film, comedy, social science, and stories from his own experience. He offers a map for navigating rough terrain, from personal trauma to the injustice and absurdity of the world. Once you are finished, check out the rest of our Popular Reading collection. Titles range from commentary, fiction, historical fiction, mystery, suspense, non-fiction, current affairs, science, social issues, and politics.

Our collection is on the first floor of Mullen Library in the Reference Reading Room.

Hold your cursor over the Title to see a short description of the book, or click to view the catalog record. The status of the book is shown beside the call number.

 

 

Title Author Status
Life Is Hard: How Philosophy Can Help Us Find Our Way Setiya, Kieran
Boldly Go: Reflections on a Life of Awe and Wonder Shatner, William & Brandon, Joshua
Mad Honey: A Novel Picoult, Jodi & Boylan, Jennifer Finney
The Evolution of Charles Darwin: The Epic Voyage of the Beagle That Forever Changed Our View of Life on Earth Preston, Diana
Fen, Bog and Swamp: A Short History of Peatland Destruction and Its Role in the Climate Crisis Proulx, Annie
You Don’t Know What War Is: The Diary of a Young Girl from Ukraine Skalietska, Yeva
Visual Thinking: The Hidden Gifts of People Who Think in Pictures, Patterns, and Abstractions Grandin, Temple
Nineteen Ways of Looking at Consciousness House, Patrick
Beyond the Wand: The Magic and Mayhem of Growing Up a Wizard Felton, Tom
Demon Copperhead Kingsolver, Barbara
They Called Me a Lioness: A Palestinian Girl’s Fight for Freedom Tamimi, Ahed & Takruri, Dena
The Family Outing: A Memoir Hempel, Jessi
Chip War: The Fight for the World’s Most Critical Technology Miller, Chris
Curse of the Reaper Mcauley, Brian
Everything the Light Touches Pariat, Janice
Livid: A Scarpetta Novel Cornwell, Patricia
A More Just Future: Psychological Tools for Reckoning With Our Past and Driving Social Change Chugh, Dolly
The Ransomware Hunting Team: A Band of Misfits’ Improbable Crusade to Save the World from Cybercrime Dudley, Renee & Golden, Daniel

For more great information from CUA Libraries, follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Mullen Library Facebook; @CUAlibraries

Open Access Week: New Features in ORCID

Open Access Week is October 24 – 30, 2022. Open Access “is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open Access ensures that anyone can access and use these results—to turn ideas into industries and breakthroughs into better lives.” (SPARC*).

What is ORCID?

As a faculty member or a graduate student, you should be establishing a scholarly presence and managing your scholarly reputation. ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is a nonprofit organization that provides a standardized way to uniquely identify researchers. ORCID provides a way to identify researchers and their work, no matter when and where it was published. The system is designed to be useful for both researchers and readers. Researchers can use ORCID to claim their work, build their profile, and receive recognition for their work. Readers can use ORCID to find more accurate and reliable citations, discover new research, and explore the work of a researcher. Specifically, ORCID is a persistent digital identifier (PID) unique to you.

 

What is ORCID? from ORCID on Vimeo.

**Need help setting up your ORCID account? Contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship, to arrange a consultation.

 

New Features in ORCID

Affiliation Manager

This new tool allows for the affiliation manager to add affiliation data to a researcher’s ORCID record by simply uploading a CSV file. Further, the affiliation manager can discover the ORCID iDs of their researchers, as well as adding and maintaining organization affiliation data to their researchers’ records. This can save researchers time and helps other systems such as grant management systems, manuscript submission systems, and university research information systems to accurately track the affiliations. Talk to Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship, for details.

44 Work Types and Growing

The type of work is central to the ORCID experience. Researchers can now add 44 work types to the registry, including CRediT (Contributor Roles Taxonomy) alongside existing contributor roles, and Data Management Plans (DMP).

Research Organization Registry (ROR)

The evolution of the PID ecosystem over the past decade has been facilitated by organization IDs. The Research Organization Registry (ROR) has been a critical component of this development by supplying organization ID metadata. ORCID has integrated this metadata into its system and now supports ROR’s Organization IDs. RORs can now be used with the API and the Affiliation Manager to easily track the impact of institutional research.

Catholic University and ORCID

Here is a screenshot of our member portal (click on the image to enlarge) with the number of affiliates over time:

 

Get an ORCID

Your ORCID ID will follow you throughout your scholarly career so acquire this unique identifier to showcase your research and ensure proper attribution of your work:

1. Claim your free ORCID ID at http://orcid.org/register

2. Import your research outputs and add biographical information using the automated import wizards.

3. Use your ORCID when applying for grants, submitting publications, or sharing your CV. Learn more at http://orcid.org

 

Need help or have questions? Please contact Kevin Gunn, Coordinator of Digital Scholarship (gunn@cua.edu).