Libraries News and Events

Open Access Week conversations

October 23rd, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, General, Research Data Services

Are we ready to have conversations about Open Access?

Barbara Fister, from the library trenches, posts her response commenting on the recent court case ruling about e-reserves.

She asks if all of us are ready to talk about how the scholarly publication process – publishing and access – can be better at spreading knowledge.

Open Minds, Open Access by Barbara Fister

…if future publications are open access it could save us all a lot of anguish and (even better) knowledge could spread much more easily and widely. The money, and the future, is already here. It’s just distributed badly. We can do better, and we will, slowly but surely.

Post expires at 9:37am on Friday October 23rd, 2015

Items from Semitics/ICOR Library on Display at Smithsonian

October 21st, 2014 by garrettt  
Posted in Library's Home page, Semitics/ICOR

Some 11 items from the Père Albert Jamme, M.Afr. Collection have been loaned to the Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery for its upcoming exhibition, “Unearthing Arabia: the Archaeological Adventures of Wendell Phillips,” October 11, 2014-June 7, 2015, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

See Unearthing Arabia ; Language and Writing

The Père Albert Jamme, M.Afr. Collection in CUA’s Semitics/ICOR Library brings together in one place 55 years of work (ca.1946-1999) by an eminent scholar of the languages and scripts of pre-Islamic Arabia.

Fr. Jamme (1916-2004) was a faculty member of CUA’s Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures between 1953 and 1997. He served as research epigrapher for important archeological expeditions to the Arabian peninsula.

The Jamme Library is a large ‘integrated’ epigraphic collection in which the evidence of inscribed stones, latex and paper squeezes or impressions, photographs, slides, rubbings, and line drawings of the inscriptions can be studied side by side with Fr. Jamme’s site maps, work notes and published studies, with the comparative lexical data of his Old South Arabian and Old North Arabian card indexes, and with his professional correspondence and research archives. Additional support is provided by his reference library of books and serials.

Work is underway to improve access to this important collection. It is the focus of a digitization project in Mullen Library. The collection, which has been in offsite storage, also is being rehoused in an epigraphic seminar room within the Semitics/ICOR library.

Qatabanian inscription

Jamme 483. Proscynema socle. Orange-steaked white alabaster. Qatabanian (Old South-Arabian) inscription: ´Aśabum [of the family] Farṣaṣum

Vatican Digitizes Manuscripts: Available free online

October 17th, 2014 by Russell, Samuel  
Posted in Religious Studies

BibliotecaApostolicaVaticanaDigitizedManuscripts

The Vatican Library has digitized over 1000 manuscripts from their collection, and made them publicly available online.

Watch this video for more information on the Digita Vaticana project. (Heads up! It’s in Italian)


For more great stories, follow us on Facebook (CUA Religious Studies, Philosophy & Canon Law Library) and Twitter (@CUATheoPhilLib)

NIH and Big Data announcement

October 10th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

NIH Awards $32-Million to Tackle Big Data in Medicine by Paul Basken

NIH is funding studies to help researchers handle big data in medicine. The data collected and collated by the Human Genome Project was just the beginning.

“We see more and more the NIH as a digital enterprise,” said Philip E. Bourne, who this year became the agency’s first permanent associate director for data science.

NIH also recognizes the the problematic issues of big data in medicine: patient privacy, standards for data, and a commitment to sharing data.

Post expires at 9:48am on Saturday January 10th, 2015

Tech Fair 2014 – October 23, 10 am – 2 pm

October 8th, 2014 by garrettt  
Posted in General, Library's Home page, Tech Tools and Tips

Tech Fair 2014 - Mullen Library - Thursday, October 23 - 10 am - 2pm

On Thursday, October 23 from 10 am to 2 pm, the University Libraries will host a Tech Fair. The entire CUA community is welcome to attend!

SCHEDULE

10:00 am – 2:00 pm – Vendor Fair (Reading Room, 2nd Floor)
Featuring: lynda.com, Blackboard, Piktochart, BrowZine, The Sunlight Foundation, Tanya Gupta (Examiner.com), ArcGIS, QOMO, Extron, Epson, Panasonic, RTZ, Computerware, Audio Associates, and CUA Technology Services.

Breakout Sessions
10:00 am – 10:50 am – Sunlight Foundation (MERIC Classroom, 1st Floor)
10:30 am – 11:20 am – Blackboard (FYE Room, 2nd Floor)
11:00 am – 11:50 am – ArcGIS (MERIC Classroom, 1st Floor)
11:30 am – 11:40 am – Password Reset Tool – CUA Technology Services (FYE Room, 2nd Floor)
11:45 am – 12:00 pm – Adobe Connect – CUA Technology Services (FYE Room, 2nd Floor)
12:00 pm – 12:50 pm – lynda.com (MERIC Classroom, 1st Floor)
12:05 pm – 12:20 pm – Panopto – CUA Technology Services (FYE Room, 2nd Floor)
12:30 pm – 1:00 pm – 3D Printing Demo (Digital Arts Lab, 2nd Floor)
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm – Google Docs Add-ons (MERIC Classroom, 1st Floor)
1:15 pm – 1:45 pm – 3D Printing Demo (Digital Arts Lab, 2nd Floor)

Giveaways and door prizes, including a free year of Piktochart Pro!

The purpose of the CUA Tech Fair is to provide members of the CUA community a chance to engage with cutting edge, interactive technology and showcase the university’s academic tools. Technology and software vendors will be on site to demonstrate their products and breakout sessions will be hosted by professionals. The goal of this University Libraries hosted event is to entertain and inform the greater CUA community about new electronic resources.

Data mining in action

October 6th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Can Big Data Tell Us What Clinical Trials Don’t?

Does a “learning health system” using mining of patient data in real-time lead to better outcomes for patients?

Using big data that already exists in patient records brings up matters of patient privacy; not to mention correlation and causation questions. However, doctors see data mining as a tool that could give them assistance beyond clinical trials.

Read the original article: Frankovich, J., Longhurst, C. A., & Sutherland, S. M. (2011). Evidence-based medicine in the EMR era. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(19), 1758-1759. doi:10.1056/NEJMp1108726

Post expires at 12:03pm on Saturday December 6th, 2014

Encouraging data sharing

September 29th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

The PLoS One  report published September 26, 2014, outlining new data sharing policies, infrastructure and tools indicates that it is good to share.

NIH Prodding Makes Data Sharing More Common, Survey Finds
Report: “Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences” ByGenevieve Pham-Kanter, Darren E. Zinner, and Eric G. Campbell published in PLoS ONE

To learn more about accessing data in the Social Sciences, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is holding a series of open webinars October 6 -9, 2014:

ICPSR Data Fair 2014: Powering Sustainable Data Access

For many years, ICPSR has hosted several public-access research data archives that are sustained by federal and foundation funding. ICPSR’s 2014 Data Fair will feature webinars about many of these archives and collections, including an introduction to the National Archive of Data on Arts and Culture; the R-DAS collection at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive; two Gates Foundation-funded collections at the Resource Center for Minority Data; an orientation to the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program; and a Q & A about the Gates Foundation-funded Measures of Effective Teaching Longitudinal Database. You will find descriptions of these webinars in the Data Fair program. Other offerings will include a presentation about ICPSR’s current efforts to fund and achieve sustainable public-access data sharing models, including its newly launched collection known as openICPSR.

Newest in Popular Reading: “The Mockingbird Next Door,” “The Girl in 6E,” “My Conference Can Beat Your Conference,” & “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy”

September 12th, 2014 by Russell, Samuel  
Posted in Humanities, Library's Home page, Religious Studies

Welcome back friends and students to another year at The Catholic University of America. If you are looking for an entertaining read between your studies, then look no further than our Popular Reading Program located on the first floor of Mullen Library near the Reference Reading Room.

Some of our newest titles are listed below. Hold your cursor over the Title to see a short description of the book, or click to view the catalog record. The status of the book is shown beside the call number.

Title Author Status
My Conference Can Beat Your Conference: Why the SEC Still Rules College Football Paul Finebaum and Gene Wojciechowski
Act of War Brad Thor
Liar, temptress, soldier, spy : four women undercover in the Civil War Karen Abbott
The end of absence : reclaiming what we’ve lost in a world of constant connection Michael Harris
Blue mind : the surprising science that shows how being near, in, on, or under water can make you happier, healthier, more connected, and better at what you do Wallace J. Nichols
What if?: serious scientific answers to absurd hypothetical questions Randall Munroe
What Makes This Book so Great Jo Walton
Feminism unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women’s Movements Dorothy Sue Cobble, Linda Gordon, and Astrid Henry
The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee Marja Mills
Eisenhower: A Life Paul Johnson
Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends on It Ian Leslie
The First Family Detail: Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of the Presidents Ronald Kessler
The fortune Hunter Daisy Goodwin
The Eye Of Heaven Clive Cussler and Russell Blake
The Queen’s Bed: An Intimate History of Elizabeth’s Court Anna Whitelock
Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician Sandeep Jauhar
The Equalizer Michael Sloan
The Girl In 6E A.R. Torre

Looking for more options? You can always see a full list of our Popular Reading books in the catalog, by searching under keyword, “CUA Popular Reading.” Happy reading!

Have you checked out lynda yet? CUA University Libraries has provided access to over 2000 video courses available through lynda’s self-paced training classes.

NIH policy on genomic data sharing

August 29th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

“The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.” From post NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

The policy’s implementation is meant to accelerate biomedical discoveries, while safeguarding patient privacy and data sensitivity. Investigators applying for grant funding in January 2015 will need to supply data-sharing plans prior to the start of their research project.

“Everyone is eager to see the incredible deluge of molecular discoveries about disease translated into prevention, diagnostics, and therapeutics for patients,” said Kathy Hudson, Ph.D., NIH deputy director for science, outreach and policy. “The collective knowledge achieved through data sharing benefits researchers and patients alike, but it must be done carefully. The GDS policy outlines the responsibilities of investigators and institutions that are using the data and also encourages researchers to get consent from participants for future unspecified use of their genomic data.”

Along with statistics about the use of dbGaP data, the Nature Genetics report outlines the challenges facing the field, such as the increased volume and complexity of genomic data.

For a link to the GDS Policy see http://gds.nih.gov.

“Google Science”: Hoax or Disruptor

August 26th, 2014 by Kimberly Hoffman  
Posted in Applied Sciences, Research Data Services

Just a note as we begin our new academic year. This blog space seeks highlight issues in scholarly communication including open access publishing, research data and alt-metrics.

Here is something to think about this week: Is Google the next big player in scholarly publishing?

How ‘Google Science’ could transform academic publishing

In part, whether Google is or is not ready to be the open access platform for scholarly communication, there are two hurdles 1) researchers’ practices and 2) the peer review process.

From the article, Timo Hannay, Managing Director of Digital Science is quoted:

The problem, he says, is not that there are too few options to publish in an open access format. It’s that most academics don’t think about it too much. “Most [academics] don’t particularly care about open access, in part because they are not incentivised to do so. This is changing, but only slowly, and right now most still care more about publishing in established, high-profile journals and in gaining a lot of citations.”

If Google, or another company, had a secret weapon to disrupt the peer review process, now that would be worth getting excited about.