Digital Scholarhsip: Have Your Say on Altmetrics!

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The National Information Standards Organization NISO has been working under an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant to “explore, identify, and advance standards and/or best practices related to a new suite of potential metrics” in scholarly publishing. This work focuses on “new assessment metrics, which include usage-based metrics, social media references, and network behavioral analysis. In addition, this project will explore potential assessment criteria for non-traditional research outputs, such as data sets, visualizations, software, and other applications.”  Read more about the NISO Alternative Assessment Metrics (Altmetrics) Initiative.

If your university of library is involved in research data services, this draft provides guidelines at every level. It explains the relationship between an article CrossRef DOI, a dataset DataCite DOI, and the scholar responsible with an ORCID ID. NEW! Alternative Outputs in Scholarly Communications: Data MetricsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

Our university has just become a member of ORCID. This draft will lead to discussion of the importance of machine readable persistent identifiers. NEW! Persistent Identifiers in Scholarly CommunicationsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

As universities and libraries have discussions about digital humanities, this draft provides lists of alternative scholarly output. NEW!  Alternative Outputs in Scholarly CommunicationsDraft for Public Comment May 13 – June 11, 2016

 

 

The Archivist’s Nook: Teacher, Rector, Soldier, Spy – A Photographic Tour of O’Connor’s Rome

Eisenhower leaving the North American College campus, as students and faculty watch below, 1959.
Eisenhower leaving the North American College campus, as students and faculty watch below, 1959.

“I am sorry that you did not travel from the College to the Ciampino airfield with the President in the helicopter; however, I have found, as I am sure you have, that riding in a helicopter is a questionable undertaking under any circumstances irrespective of who you are with,” wrote John McCone, future CIA Director, to Archbishop Martin J. O’Connor, rector of the North American College (NAC) in Rome. The occasion? The recent visit of President Eisenhower to the seminary in December 1959.

O’Connor escorting Mr. and Mrs. Nixon to an audience with Pope Paul VI, 1963. This was not Nixon’s first or last papal audience nor O’Connor’s first or last visit with Nixon.
O’Connor escorting Mr. and Mrs. Nixon to an audience with Pope Paul VI, 1963. This was not Nixon’s first or last papal audience nor O’Connor’s first or last visit with Nixon.

In the fall of 1959, the North American College in Rome celebrated its 100th anniversary. Founded in 1859 by Pope Pius IX, the Pontifical North American College had much to celebrate that year. Having been devastated during the Second World War, much like the surrounding city, the school had been in a precarious position just a decade prior. Now, it stood rebuilt on the Janiculum Hill, serving as a nexus point not only for seminarians, but also representatives of American power and the Vatican. And at the center of it all was Archbishop O’Connor.

Known as the Oakball, or Oaky, by his students and faculty, O’Connor (1900-1986) became the “second founder” of the NAC. [1] A native of Scranton, Pennsylvania, O’Connor was a World War I veteran, attended CUA and the NAC, served as an official press representative for Vatican II, and even became the first Papal Nuncio to Malta. Wrangling the assorted personalities, factions, and financial resources to rebuild the school and put it on stable footing was no easy task, but O’Connor proved capable of weathering the challenge. Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: Teacher, Rector, Soldier, Spy – A Photographic Tour of O’Connor’s Rome”

Digital Scholarship: Are You Following the News?

If you are following the news and understand what is going on in the world of scholarly publishing and libraries – you’re a better man than I, Gunga Din!¹ It gets curiouser and curiouser. ²

In early May, CrossRef announced Members will soon be able to assign Crossref DOIs to preprints . This is seen as a positive step in Open Access. Scholarly publication that has been peer reviewed, but is not the final published version is known as a preprint. Many researchers have their preprint publications available, often on web sites or in repositories. One example of a preprint repository is arXiv.org e-Print archive.

Today, we learn that SSRN — a leading social science and humanities repository and online community — joins Elsevier.

And, from Nature Social-sciences preprint server snapped up by publishing giant Elsevier.

Scholarly communications and science communication is a puzzlement!³

Can John Oliver set us straight? See: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Scientific Studies (HBO) 


[1] “Gunga Din (Lit.) Rudyard Kipling’s poem ‘Gunga Din’ (1892) tells of an Indian water-carrier who is killed bringing water to a wounded English officer in the battlefield. The poem ends with the famous lines:

Tho’ I’ve belted you an flayed you, By the livin’ Gawd that made you, You’re a better man than I am, Gunga Din!”

The phrase ‘you’re a better man than I,  Gunga Din!’ is used in admiration for someone’s daring, courage and selflessness.

Oxford Dictionary of Reference and Allusion, Third Edition, 2012: p162

[2] Ibid. Curiouser and curiouser: A phrase used repeatedly by *Alice in Lewis Carroll’s children’s story Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland…

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[3] Puzzlement: As a mass noun: the fact or condition of being puzzled; perplexity, bewilderment, confusion. Oxford English Dictionary (online).

News & Events – May 16, 2016

Summer Hours – Our hours are reduced during the summer. From May 16 through August 6, Mullen Library will be open the following times:

Monday – Thursday: 9 am to 9 pm

Friday – Saturday: 9 am to 5 pm

Sunday: 1 pm to 5 pm

For a complete schedule, including Mullen Library and campus library hours, please click here.

Library Access in Summer – In order to maintain borrowing privileges and access to online resources off campus, students must be registered for summer or fall courses. If you have any problems accessing your account, please contact Access Services at 202-319-5060.

Popular Reading – Want to find some good recreational reading for the summer? Check out our Popular Reading collection on the north end of the lobby of Mullen Library. Any faculty, staff, or student registered for summer or fall courses has borrowing privileges during the summer.

lynda.com  – Why not take advantage of the online learning video library at lynda.com during the summer break? Hit the ground running in the fall with courses on graphic design, time management, presentation skills, and so much more. Visit our lynda.com page to get started!

The Archivist’s Nook: Provoking the Canon – Moog, Meyers, and Experimental Music

Emerson Meyers
Emerson Meyers

In honor of Moogfest, next week’s fantastic electronic music/art festival in North Carolina (that I wish I was going to), this month I wanted to highlight some CUA connections to not only early electronic music, but also to Bob Moog himself, the inventor of the legendary synthesizer, and the person after whom Moogfest is named.

Would you believe that CUA was once a pioneering institution for experimental music? Founded in 1961 by Professor Emerson Meyers, the university’s Electronic Music Laboratory housed the most state-of-the-art recording equipment of the time, including one Moog synthesizer. This particular unit was one of the first manufactured; indeed, the School of Music was so eager to procure one that official manuals were not available at the time of purchase. How, then, did they figure out how to operate what was then a completely new kind of instrument? They wrote directly to Moog, who replied with pages and pages of technical instructions and hand-drawn diagrams that we still have here at the Archives. Faculty then used these documents to create in-house manuals for the equipment in the studio. Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: Provoking the Canon – Moog, Meyers, and Experimental Music”

News & Events: May 9, 2016

Image courtesy of CUA Public Affairs.

Congratulations Class of 2016!

Reminders for Graduates – If you are graduating this Saturday, here are some important things to remember:

  • Log into My Library Account to check for any outstanding library loans or unpaid fines. Unpaid fines or overdue items will result in a hold on your account and prevent graduation. If you have any questions regarding your library account, please call Access Services at 202-319-5060.
  • Through the office of Alumni Relations, many library resources you enjoyed as a services are made available to you! If you are interested in continued access to these services, please visit the Benefits & Services page. You must register through Alumni Relations to take advantage of these benefits.

Summer Hours – Our hours are reduced during the summer. For a complete schedule, including Mullen Library and campus library hours, please click here.

Popular Reading – Want to find some good recreational reading for the summer? Check out our Popular Reading collection on the north end of the lobby of Mullen Library. Any faculty, staff, or student registered for summer or fall courses has borrowing privileges during the summer.

lynda.com  – Why not take advantage of the online learning video library at lynda.com during the summer break? Hit the ground running in the fall with courses on graphic design, time management, presentation skills, and so much more. Visit our lynda.com page to get started!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: If Librarians Were Honest

Happy end of your semester, academic year, or college experience from your CUA Librarians! Happy summer and visit a library!

No one spends time here without being changed.

From “If Librarians Were Honest” by Joseph Mills

“… a book indeed sometimes debauched me from my work….”!!!!
– Benjamin Franklin
If librarians were honest,
they wouldn’t smile, or act
welcoming. They would say,
You need to be careful. Here
be monsters.
They would say,
These rooms house heathens
and heretics, murderers and
maniacs, the deluded, desperate,
and dissolute.
They would say,
These books contain knowledge
of death, desire, and decay,
betrayal, blood, and more blood;
each is a Pandora’s box, so why
would you want to open one.
They would post danger
signs warning that contact
might result in mood swings,
severe changes in vision,
and mind-altering effects.
Read the whole poem in The Artist’s Library by Erinn Batykefer and Laura Damon-Moore: p54

News & Events: May 2, 2016

FINALS WEEK – For finals week, we are pleased to provide:

  • 24-Hour Access – Mullen Library will be open around the clock Monday through Friday. Saturday, Mullen will be open 9 am to 5 pm.
  • Coffee, Tea, and Snacks – Visit the May Gallery in Mullen Library for refreshments.

ATTENTION GRADUATES – If you will be graduating this semester, please make sure your library account is in good standing before May 13. You may do this by logging into My Library Account to check for any outstanding library loans or unpaid fines. Unpaid fines or overdue items will result in a hold on your account and prevent graduation. If you have any questions regarding your library account, please call Access Services at 202-319-5060.

NOT IN OUR LIBRARY? REQUEST IT! – Mullen has a lot of books, but we don’t have everything. If you find a book you’d like from another WRLC library, this video will show you how to have it brought to Mullen for you to check out.

 

Have a great summer!  ·  Congratulations graduates!

The Archivist’s Nook: John Mitchell – Apostle of Labor

Contemporary newspaper depicting the people and events of the Anthracite Coal Strike, 1902. John Mitchell Papers, American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
Contemporary newspaper depicting the people and events of the Anthracite Coal Strike, 1902. John Mitchell Papers, American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

May First is a date full of meaning as ‘May Day’, a traditional European spring festival, the Feast Day of St. Joseph the Worker for Roman Catholics, and International Workers’ Day for leftists. However one marks this day it is certainly an appropriate time to note one of the most important figures in American labor history, John Mitchell, whose archival papers, including an online digital collection of his photographs, are housed at Catholic University. If Terence V. Powderly can be called ‘Labor’s American Idol,’ Mitchell was widely recognized as The Apostle of Labor after he led the fledgling United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) union through one of history’s most significant strikes, the Anthracite Coal Strike of 1902. He also wrote two books, Organized Labor (1903) and The Wage Earner (1913), arguing capital and labor could work together if both were linked in prosperity.

Mitchell was born 4 February 1870 in the coal mining village of Braidwood, Illinois, to poor Irish immigrants. Orphaned at a young age, he had little opportunity for education, and by age 12 was working in the coal mines. He joined the Knights of Labor in 1885 and in 1890 was a founding member of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA). He became an international union organizer in 1897, working alongside the celebrated “Mother” Mary Harris Jones, before being elected UMWA Vice President that same year, and President in 1899. Union activity in this era was a risky business as coal operators controlled the mines, coal towns, and coal miners who were forced to endure horrible conditions and long hours. Miners were often paid with coupons that could only be redeemed at company stores at inflated prices and had to buy tools and supplies such as dynamite for blasting and oil for lamps. As UMWA president, Mitchell, with his priestly mien, worked to incorporate new workers from various immigrant groups, mostly Catholic, who showed their affection by nicknaming him ‘Johnnie da Mitch.’   Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: John Mitchell – Apostle of Labor”