Appy Hour: Genius

App: Genius Genius app
By: Genius Media Group
Price: Free
Device: Reviewed on iPhone

Genius allows you to explore and create annotations on any piece of text from the mundane (song lyrics, poems, novels) to the unexpected (lists of all the deaths on Game of Thrones, restaurant menus, etc.). Read Lin-Manuel Miranda’s own notes about Hamilton and listen to the songs as you decipher the lyrics. Study William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet line by line while watching videos of the play. Contribute your own annotations to the site or discuss pieces with people all over the world.

All of this can also be found at the Genius website, but the app offers more features. Hold your phone up to music and the lyrics will appear on your screen. Genius can identify the music in your iTunes so you can get the scoop on the tracks you love.

Digital Scholarship: Citation Needed

Cite your sources.

Never have we needed this exhortation more. We won’t make the case here again (because we have before!) Digital scholars use digital tools – use a reference manager as you research and write.

CUA Libraries provide RefWorks and EndNote Online for researchers, but there are other products. For help getting started with reference managers, please Meet with a Librarian.

Take a few minutes to enjoy this Plagiarism Rap from the University of Alberta!

 

News & Events: September 19, 2016

WRLC Newsletter – The September 2016 edition of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) Newsletter is available. To subscribe to the newsletter, visit this page.

Meet with a Librarian – CUA students can now schedule a consultation with a librarian through Meet with a Librarian. Our librarians are available to meet with you about finding useful information resources, using a citation style, developing a research strategy, and much more. Please allow at least 24 hours between requesting a meeting and your suggested meeting times.

Distance Learners – If you are a student in one of CUA’s online programs through Engage, or if you are a graduate student completing your dissertation away from campus, please visit our page for Distance Learners. This page conveniently places all the tools you need to access the library’s resources from afar.

Center for Academic Success and Writing Center – The University Libraries is pleased to welcome the Center for Academic Success to Mullen Library. The check-in desk is located at the main entrance to the second floor. The Writing Center is also now located on the second floor in room 219. To learn more, please visit the Center for Academic Success’s website at http://success.cua.edu/ or the Writing Center’s website at http://english.cua.edu/wc/.

The Archivist’s Nook: Tending the Fields of Social Justice

Linna Eleanor Bresette, standard portrait of her, ca. 1930. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
Linna Eleanor Bresette, standard portrait of her, ca. 1930. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

Linna Eleanor Bresette (1882-1960), was a teacher and pioneering social justice advocate in her native Kansas for nearly a decade before serving for thirty years as the field secretary of the Social Action Department (SAD) of the National Catholic Welfare Conference (now the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops). It was with the SAD that she worked with legendary labor priests John A. Ryan, Raymond McGowan, and George G. Higgins as a tireless field worker on behalf of the working poor regardless of race or gender.

Bresette was a teacher and later principal in the Topeka Public Schools. After Kansas granted voting rights to women in 1912, she became the first woman factory inspector and the first focused on women workers. After travelling the state observing labor conditions, she proposed the creation of an Industrial Welfare Commission. It was created by the legislature despite stiff employer resistance.  She became the Commission secretary, continuing her role as a fair but tough factory inspector, and also helping write minimum wage and child labor laws in Kansas. Inevitably, she made powerful enemies among employers, who joined together in 1921 to force her resignation, despite public protests on her behalf.

An excerpt relating to Bresette’s 1931 Pilgrimage to Rome from the story about her in the September 23, 1953 issue of the Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact comic book, America Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
An excerpt relating to Bresette’s 1931 Pilgrimage to Rome from the story about her in the September 23, 1953 issue of the Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact comic book, America Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

Bresette had already achieved stature as a social justice advocate so she received numerous job offers, including from the federal government and the National Catholic Welfare Conference (NCWC) headed by the redoubtable John Burke, CSP, in Washington, D.C. She accepted the position of field secretary from the latter’s Social Action Department (SAD). She had been an active Catholic in Kansas, having been president of an organization of Catholic women. She also helped organize parish classes and evening schools for Mexicans who increasingly came to the United States looking for work after the 1910 revolution in their country.

With the SAD, Bresette thrived on grass roots efforts in the field, living up to her job title, as she traveled the country, over thirty states and thousands of miles, promoting social justice for workers. She became known as “The Workingman’s Friend” and also “The Workingwoman’s Friend” as she organized diocesan councils of Catholic women, Catholic summer schools for women, and regional meetings of the Catholic Conference on Industrial Problems (CCIP). Her enthusiasm and humor are on display in a 1930 letter¹ she wrote from the Los Angeles CCIP meeting to her boss, Rev. John A. Ryan, stating the conference ‘was great!”, but also referring to a bad speaker with “I deserve to be fired for putting that man Deeney on the Program.”

An example of the pioneering work of Bresette, a pamphlet of her 1928 survey of Mexicans in the U.S., National Catholic Welfare Conference (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops), Social Action Department Records, American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
An example of the pioneering work of Bresette, a pamphlet of her 1928 survey of Mexicans in the U.S., National Catholic Welfare Conference (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops), Social Action Department Records, American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

Bresette notably organized conferences on African-Americans and Mexican laborers. In fact, she conducted the first Catholic social study on Mexicans in the United States in 1928².  She also helped found the Priests’ Institutes on the Encyclicals to educate lay and clerical Catholics on the Papal Encyclicals oriented to social justice, most notably Rerum Novarum and Quadragesimo Anno. Additionally, she was involved with the American Association of Social Work, Catholic Association for International Peace (CAIP), National Conference of Catholic Charities (now Catholic Charities USA), National Conference of Social Work, National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW), and the White House Conferences on Children and Youth.  

Although largely forgotten in the twenty-first century, Bresette was honored in her time, receiving the Immaculata Medal from Conception College in 1941, an honorary doctorate from Rosary College in 1947, and Papal Pro Eclesia et Pontifice, also in 1947. An unmarried laywoman, her retirement at age 69 in 1951 was lamented by the NCWC who gave a reception in her honor.³ She died at her home in Kansas City in 1960. Her legacy is preserved at The Catholic University of America (CUA) Archives in the records of the Social Action Department and a story on her in a 1953 issue4 of the Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact comic book. Additionally, Michael Barga has a fine entry on her at the Social Welfare History Project site.


¹Bresette to Ryan, April 2, 1930, John A. Ryan Papers, box 4, folder 37.

²Mexicans in the United States, 1928, Social Action Department (SAD) Records, box 68, folder 5.

³Administration: Personnel File, 1951, Executive Department/Office of the General Secretary, box 4, folder 13.

4‘Catholics in Action,’ February 26, 1953, Vol. 8, No. 13, pp 28-33, Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact Comic Book Collection, box 7, folder 13.

News & Events: September 12, 2016

Music Library Open House –  The Music Library will be hosting an open house Tuesday, September 13, from 2pm to 4pm. The feature of the event will be a live streamed performance by the Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar and Gustavo Dudamel from Musikfest Berlin. The streaming is provided through the libraries institutional subscription to the Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall. Light refreshments will be provided.

Meet with a Librarian – CUA students can now schedule a consultation with a librarian through Meet with a Librarian. Our librarians are available to meet with you about finding useful information resources, using a citation style, developing a research strategy, and much more. Please allow at least 24 hours between requesting a meeting and your suggested meeting times.

Distance Learners – If you are a student in one of CUA’s online programs through Engage, or if you are a graduate student completing your dissertation away from campus, please visit our page for Distance Learners. This page conveniently places all the tools you need to access the library’s resources from afar.

Center for Academic Success and Writing Center – The University Libraries is pleased to welcome the Center for Academic Success to Mullen Library. The check-in desk is located at the main entrance to the second floor. The Writing Center is also now located on the second floor in room 219. To learn more, please visit the Center for Academic Success’s website at http://success.cua.edu/ or the Writing Center’s website at http://english.cua.edu/wc/.

Digital Scholarship: Created at CUA

Where do you preserve your digital scholarship? If you publish in journals, you may be using ResearchGate or Academia.Edu to share your publications. Is this a long-term solution? Maybe not. Are you working on a conference paper or poster? Save them at your institution’s open access repository.

From A social networking site is not an open access repository by the University of California Office of Scholarly Communication:

Open access repositories are usually managed by universities, government agencies, or nonprofit associations. Affiliation with a larger institution (with a public service mission) means that repositories are likely to be around for a long time.

ResearchGate and Academia.edu are commercial sites, whereas most open access repositories are non-profits.

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You have open access options that are long-term. Take some time to look at The Catholic University of America’s Open Access Repository – Digital Collections . Look to the most recently published dissertations highlighted on the front page; or search the Institutional Repository link for the dissertations by school.

News & Events: September 5, 2016

13886520_10155026016659325_5125804717107609245_nHappy Labor Day!

Meet with a Librarian – CUA students can now schedule a consultation with a librarian through Meet with a Librarian. Our librarians are available to meet with you about finding useful information resources, using a citation style, developing a research strategy, and much more. Please allow at least 24 hours between requesting a meeting and your suggested meeting times.

Digital Arts Lab – The Department of Art’s Digital Arts Lab on the second floor of Mullen Library will be open to the CUA community at the following times:

  • Monday8:00AM – 11:00AM
  • Wednesday8:00AM – 2:00PM
  • Friday9:00AM – 2:00PM
  • Saturday9:00AM – 2:00PM

Closing of Architecture & Planning Library – The Architecture & Planning Library in the Crough Center has closed permanently, and its collections are being transferred to Mullen Library. Faculty needing to place items on course reserve may contact Lea Harrison (harrisonl@cua.edu); students and faculty needing research assistance may contact the Liaison Librarian for Architecture & Planning, Anne Marie Hules (hules@cua.edu); and anyone needing help locating specific titles during the transition and relocation of collections may contact Taras Zvir, Interim Stacks Supervisor (zvir@cua.edu).

Appy Hour: Funny Or Die Weather

App: Funny Or Die Weather FODW
By: Funny Or Die, Inc.
Price: Free
Device: Reviewed on iPhone

Before you head out for some fun in the sun this Labor Day weekend, check the weather to make sure you won’t be caught in a downpour on the beach. Add some humor with the Funny Or Die Weather app. It shows you real weather forecasts along with funny “facts” like “The humidity of water is extremely high.” You can also share these sarcastic facts, weather tips, and thoughts of the day on social media so your friends can be in on the joke too.

 

This app is attractive, easy to use, and entertaining.

 

The Archivist’s Nook: Mother Teresa’s Archival Footprints

Eileen Egan and Mother Teresa, Catholic Relief Services Visit to Leper Families, 1958. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
Eileen Egan and Mother Teresa, Catholic Relief Services Visit to Leper Families, 1958. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

On an October day in 1960, a small, sari-clad woman arrived in Las Vegas. It was her first visit to the United States and first time away from her adopted home in India in over 30 years. A former geography teacher and now head of her own order, the Missionaries of Charity, this unassuming nun known as Mother Teresa had arrived in a city she described as a perpetual light festival, or “Diwali.” While little known outside Kolkata (Calcutta) at the time, Teresa had been invited to address the National Council of Catholic Women annual conference. Sitting at a little booth during the conference, she addressed an endless series of questions about her sari, free service to the poor, and Albanian origins.

Months ahead of her trip, Teresa had written to her colleague, Eileen Egan: “Thank God I have plenty to do – otherwise I would be terrified of that big public. Being an Indian citizen, I will have to get an Indian passport.”¹ This one sentence encapsulates much of the relationship between Egan and Teresa, revealing personal elements of Teresa’s life and work, as well as the more mundane background work it took to continue her mission.

Egan and Teresa, ca. 1970s. Catholic Relief Services was instrumental in aiding and spreading Teresa’s mission and message across the world. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
Egan and Teresa, ca. 1970s. Catholic Relief Services was instrumental in aiding and spreading Teresa’s mission and message across the world. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

Egan, a long-time peace activist and employee of Catholic Relief Services, had been a co-worker of this relatively unknown nun for five years at this point. In the 1940s, both Teresa and Egan each experienced a calling to aid those ravaged by poverty, disease, and conflict. While Egan put her organizational and journalistic skills towards refugee relief, Teresa began the initial steps in founding a new religious order devoted to tending the sick, poor, and dying. In 1955, they would meet for the first time in the streets of Kolkata. Out of this initial meeting, the two women would strike up a close association that would endure the following four decades.

Thanks to Egan’s donation, the Archives holds the records of this relationship in the Eileen Egan’s Mother Teresa Collection. Not only did Egan and Teresa correspond regularly, but Egan collected materials related to the life and work of Teresa and her order. Their personal and professional interactions are reflected through hundreds of handwritten letters, photographs, newspaper clippings, and more.

Not only can one glimpse letters discussing administrative duties and spiritual reflection from Teresa, one see the growth of her order and renown as the world became inspired by this quiet sister working in the streets. Among the various highlights are: photographs documenting the first Missionary house to open outside India, in Venezuela in 1965; letters preserved in which Teresa agrees to accept her first honorary degree at Catholic University in 1971; an autographed copy of Teresa’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech; and, letters from Sunday school students across the United States writing to the newly-minted Nobel laureate.

Mother Teresa playing with an abandoned child, Kolkata, 1960. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.
Mother Teresa playing with an abandoned child, Kolkata, 1960. American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives.

For a scholar of Teresa and her order, the collection is rich in biographical insights. In addition, the Archives houses a second Mother Teresa collection – the Co-Workers of Mother Teresa in America. This collection, begun by Violet Collins, catalogs the history of the lay American and international volunteers working alongside the Missionaries of Charity. While this collection is less focused on Mother Teresa, it does provide a glimpse into the work of lay people inspired by her example.

Returning to Egan, however, provides further insight into Teresa’s time in Nevada. To calm herself before addressing the crowds gathered at the conference, Teresa requested a trip out into the surrounding desert. Sitting silently next a cactus, Egan reports that the future saint silently meditated until she felt ready to face her audience. Upon completing her contemplation, Teresa did finally collect a souvenir – “a few of the long cactus spines which were easily twined into a crown of thrones. This she took back to Calcutta as a tangible memento of Las Vegas. It was placed on the head of the crucified Christ hanging behind the altar in the novitiate chapel.”²

Those interested in exploring more of the insights Egan or the Co-Workers collections offer into the life of the saint or the work of those she inspired, can contact the Archives by emailing archives@mail.lib.cua.edu.


¹ Eileen Egan, Such a Vision of the Street: Mother Teresa – The Spirit and the Work (Garden City, New York: Image Books, 1986) 134.

² Ibid., 137.