Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Passion!

218px-Rose7568
Experience Research Passion!

Scholarly communications can get bogged down in discussions of metrics, publishing models, open access,  promotion & tenure, and funder mandates. These discussions are important but miss that essential ingredient that makes the world spin and life worth living – passion!

The first CUA Physics Department Colloquium of February featured Raffaele Resta, Ph.D. speaking on Are Polarization and Magnetization Really Bulk Properties?   Dr. Resta’s was an Adjunct professor from 1996-1999 at The Catholic University. The passion of the researcher drew the audience along on his more than forty year journey of the mind imaging and mathematically establishing polarization and magnetism theories.

Dr. Resta has one of the most cited papers and many books on his subjects. While we, who are not physicists, may not understand the intricate mathematical equations on Dr. Resta’s slides; we can recognize his passion for his subject and appreciate the language of this passionate research:

What is a good property? Why do we need somewhat exotic theories? What is the nearsighted QM Maxwell demon? One’s head spins with imagining that the nasty position operator “r” is ill defined, convergence with the Flake size, orbital magnetization density, or the Haldanium paradigm (F.D.M. Haldane, 1988)…

Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Passion!”

News & Events: February 8, 2016

Happy St. Valentine’s Day!

WRLC NEWSLETTER – The February edition of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) Newsletter is available. To subscribe to the newsletter, visit this page.

ONGOING TRIAL – The University Libraries has a trial underway for the Early Arabic Printed Books from the British Library until February 22. The online collection represents the digitization of one of the world’s most important Arabic collections, based on A.G. Ellis’ catalog from 1894. The full collection includes books on a variety of subjects, printed from the fifteenth to nineteenth century in Arabic script, as well as translations into European and Asian languages. Together, these works demonstrate Europe’s fascination with and assimilation of thinking from the Arabic-speaking world. This is the first major text-searchable online archive of pre-20th century Arabic printed books. Early Arabic Printed Books from the British Library is part of Gale’s Arabic program which aims to provide Arabic primary resources for teaching and research. Scholars can search on the full text of items in Arabic, English, French, German, Latin, Italian, Dutch and Spanish while also being able to discover content in Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Ottoman Turkish, Persian, Syriac and more.  To access the trial, visit http://www.galesupport.com/trial/cu2016. Please send any feedback before or after the trial to Dr. Monica Blanchard at blanchard@cua.edu.

LYNDA.COM – Have you tried lynda.com? It’s an online video training library offering more than 2,000 self-paced training classes on a wide range of computer and project management skills for beginner, intermediate, and advanced users. Topics offered include: the entire suite of Microsoft and Adobe products, website development, business skills, design skills, audio and video tools, creative inspirations, and much more.  All of the courses are taught by expert instructors and come with fully searchable transcripts. Curated playlists are also available for over 150 topics. To learn more, check out this introductory video.

The Archivist’s Nook: African American History? You’re Standing On It

The Middleton House was the main house on the CUA property when it was a slave run plantation. Sold to the U.S. Catholic Bishops after the Civil War, the house served several purposes for the University until it was demolished in 1970.
The Middleton House was the main house on the CUA property when it was a slave run plantation. Sold to the U.S. Catholic Bishops after the Civil War, the house served several purposes for the University until it was demolished in 1970.

It’s African American History Month, and we’ve got all kinds of  African-American history here at The Catholic University of America.

In fact, you’re standing on it.  The original 65 acres purchased by the U.S. Catholic Bishops to found the University is rife with African American history.  It didn’t start out that way.  Initially, the first house built on the current CUA campus was built by Samuel Harrison Smith and Margaret Bayard Smith.  The Smiths were invited to settle in the young capital city in 1803 by President Thomas Jefferson and found the District’s first newspaper.  Later, the house passed on to James Middleton and his son Erasmus Middleton.  The Middleton family held it as a slave-run plantation, until the Emancipation Act of 1862 (the first emancipation act in the nation, by the way) liberated the slaves of Washington, D.C.  The house eventually became part of the CUA campus and was demolished in 1970.

During the Civil War, Fort Slemmer was established on the perimeter of campus.  One of 68 fortifications protecting the city during the war, the fort never saw action, but it did play its part in the Civil War.

Euphemia Haynes Lofton, Educational Superstar of the District of Columbia. Here, she is pictured with her Ph.D. in Mathematics from CUA. Haynes Lofton was the first African American woman to graduate with a doctoral degree in math in the U.S.
Euphemia Lofton Haynes, Educational Superstar of the District of Columbia. Here, she is pictured with her Ph.D. in Mathematics from CUA.  Lofton Haynes was the first African American woman to graduate with a doctoral degree in math in the U.S.

If we fan out a bit further into Washington, we can appreciate the contributions of CUA Alumna Euphemia Lofton Haynes to African American history locally.  The ambitious Euphemia Lofton graduated valedictorian of M Street High School in 1907, from Miner Normal School in 1909, and Smith College in 1914.  She earned her Ph.D. in Mathematics from CUA in 1943 with a dissertation titled Determination of Sets of Independent Conditions Characterizing Certain Special Cases of Symmetric Correspondences.  The degree gives her the distinction of being the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics in the United States.

Euphemia contributed quite grandly to the educational system of the District of Columbia.  In 1930 Dr. Lofton Haynes created the Mathematics Department at Miner’s Teacher’s College after she became a professor there in 1930. She remained the head of the Mathematics Department for almost 30 years. When she retired in 1959 Miner’s Teachers College had become the University of the District of Columbia.  She taught at all levels in the District of Columbia public school system, including elementary school, high school, and college.  Her family papers can be accessed at the CUA archives.

Who do you notice when you first look at this photo? Archives staff didn’t even see former President of the U.S., George Bush, when they first looked at this shot. Rather, they noticed their favorite researcher and historian of the African-American experience, Cyprian Davis, third in, the top row. Here he is pictured receiving an honorary doctor of laws degree in 2001 at Notre Dame University.
Who do you notice when you first look at this photo? Archives staff didn’t even see former President of the U.S., George Bush, when they first looked at this shot. Rather, they noticed their favorite researcher and historian of the African-American experience, Cyprian Davis, third in, the top row. Here he is pictured receiving an honorary doctor of laws degree in 2001 at Notre Dame University.

Another native Washingtonian and alumnus of CUA left his papers to the archives just this past year.  Father Cyprian Davis, author of the first history of African American Catholics in the United States, was a regular at the CUA Archives and a Benedictine monk at St. Meinrad Archabbey in St. Meinrad, Indiana.  Father Davis wrote the award-winning Black Catholics of the United States, among other books on the history of African-American Catholics .  Rest in Peace, Father Davis, and we will see that future researchers of African-American Catholicism have full access to your archive.

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Trending in Scholarly Communications

Throughabout_Rotonde_Verkeersbord_3The Catholic University of America, as a campus community is engaged in the work of scholarly communication – the system through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use. In April, CUA will be celebrating scholarly communications and research by sponsoring its’ first campus wide Research Day! Be there!

The Scholarly Kitchen is a blog sponsored by the Society of Scholarly Publishing (SSP.) In January 2016, the blog highlighted scholarly communications trends.  What Do You See On The Horizon For Scholarly Publishing In 2016?

Some of the trends to pay attention to:

  • Impact metrics
  • Author’s Rights – what does that CC BY really mean? New authoring innovations from publishers.
  • Rise of Gold OA, and not enough information about Green OA
  • Innovative  growth due to technology – Open Library of the Humanities
  • ORCID at tipping point – SHARE and CHORUS growth

Judy Luther introduces new tools to check out.

“Up till now Google Scholar has been the primary discovery tool for OA and paid scholarly content.  This may change with the launch of two new services: ACI, which indexes and hosts 10,000 curated scholarly blogs and 1Science , which indexes all OA peer reviewed articles wherever they are found. “

Alice Meadows discusses one of the more succinct wishes for scholarly communications may be that it is acknowledged as essential.

“Last but not least I hope this will be the year when we start to collectively acknowledge the importance of sustainability in scholarly communications and begin building some consensus around what that means — both for commercial and nonprofit organizations.”

The CUA Librarians offer a scholarly communications module for instruction which includes discussion of open access and tools every scholar should be using. Please contact Kim Hoffman for more information.

News & Events: February 1, 2016

NEW TRIAL – The University Libraries has a trial available for the Early Arabic Printed Books from the British Library from now until February 22. The online collection represents the digitization of one of the world’s most important Arabic collections, based on A.G. Ellis’ catalog from 1894. The full collection includes books on a variety of subjects, printed from the fifteenth to nineteenth century in Arabic script, as well as translations into European and Asian languages. Together, these works demonstrate Europe’s fascination with and assimilation of thinking from the Arabic-speaking world. This is the first major text-searchable online archive of pre-20th century Arabic printed books. Early Arabic Printed Books from the British Library is part of Gale’s Arabic program which aims to provide Arabic primary resources for teaching and research. Scholars can search on the full text of items in Arabic, English, French, German, Latin, Italian, Dutch and Spanish while also being able to discover content in Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Ottoman Turkish, Persian, Syriac and more.  To access the trial, visit http://www.galesupport.com/trial/cu2016. Please send any feedback before or after the trial to Dr. Monica Blanchard at blanchard@cua.edu.

WRITING CENTER IN MULLEN – Did you know that the Writing Center holds satellite hours in Mullen Library? On Wednesdays from 5-8pm and Saturdays from 11am-2pm, stop by the Mullen lobby for one-on-one help with your written assignments. To read more about what support the Writing Center provides and to see their full hours at other locations, go to http://english.cua.edu/wc/.

HELP AVAILABLE – We’re here to help connect you to the information and resources you need!

The Archivist’s Nook: Get Paranoid – Data Collection in Libraries

…with your user data?
…with your user data?

The issue of patron and student privacy has raged across library school classrooms and the profession in general since time immemorial. Indeed, my own MLIS final exam hinged upon presenting a cohesive (ha!) data collection plan for a mid-sized university that balanced the rights of students, the needs of institutions, and various legal requirements. Some librarians, energized by, for example, the Snowden revelations of 2013 or the fact that the Google education ecosystem tracks student activity with no opt-out clause, have kick-started initiatives to not only increase awareness of privacy issues but also help libraries take concrete steps to combat what could be interpreted as infringements on intellectual freedom. Whether setting up public Tor nodes (a core component of the Library Freedom Project) or using Riseup.net email addresses actually improves privacy or not is debatable, but one thing is clear – this is a conversation worth having. Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: Get Paranoid – Data Collection in Libraries”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: E-book Readers as Digital Tools

Beyond just reading, you may want use the digital tools embedded into e-book readers. The e-book platform ebrary has a new look and options. Please see the “Playlist” feature in the upper left corner of the video below and pull down to see the chapters: ebrary New Reader Overview, ebrary New Reader Downloading and ebrary New Reader – Annotations, Highlights and Bookmarks.

See this link for demonstration using a CUA e-book Chronology of the Crusades by Timothy Venning and Peter Frankopan (2015.) [Off campus link here]

 

This youtube link.
For more help from ebrary: ebrary – Search, Find and Use EBooks: About
For more help on all CUA e-books: E-Books guide

The Archivist’s Nook: T.V. Powderly-Nineteenth-Century ‘American Idol’

Group portrait of leaders of the Knights of Labor, with Powderly prominent. T.V. Powderly Papers, The Catholic University of America (CUA).

January 22 is the birthday of Terence Vincent Powderly (1849-1924), a man not widely remembered in the twenty-first century, but a national celebrity, an ‘American Idol’ if you will, in the tumultuous era of the late nineteenth century. Born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, to Irish-Catholic immigrants, Powderly was a reform minded Mayor of Scranton (1878-1884), head of the national Knights of Labor union (1879-1893), and federal bureaucrat (1897-1924).  He was also a supporter of Irish nationalism, serving in Clan na Gael, a secret Irish independence society, and the Irish Land League, a political organization supporting tenant farmers.

Labor friends and celebrities in old age: T.V. Powderly, Nineteenth-Century ‘American Idol’ with ‘Mother’ Mary Harris Jones, ‘The Miner’s Angel.’ Washington, D.C., 1909. T.V. Powderly Papers, The Catholic University of America (CUA).
Labor friends and celebrities in old age: T.V. Powderly, Nineteenth-Century ‘American Idol’ with ‘Mother’ Mary Harris Jones, ‘The Miner’s Angel.’ Washington, D.C., 1909. T.V. Powderly Papers, The Catholic University of America (CUA).

A railroad worker, Powderly joined the Scranton Local Assembly of the Knights of Labor in 1876, assuming the national leadership as Grand (later General) Master Workman, 1879-1893. The Knights came into national prominence during his tenure, in part due to his rousing public oratory, peaking in national membership and influence in 1886. At this point, Powderly was so popular there were babies named for him. However, failures in several labor disputes and a divisive power struggle saw the Knights rapidly decline and Powderly removed by a cabal involving John William Hayes, whose papers are also at CUA. Perhaps Powderly’s greatest achievement, greatly aided by Cardinal James Gibbons of Baltimore, was to bring about reconciliation between the labor movement and the Roman Catholic Church that distrusted and disapproved of labor organizations due to their secretive and ritualistic activities.

Immigrants, both detailed aliens and regular employees, working in an Ellis Island kitchen, Dec. 18, 1901. T.V. Powderly Papers, The Catholic University of America (CUA).
Immigrants, both detailed aliens and regular employees, working in an Ellis Island kitchen, Dec. 18, 1901. T.V. Powderly Papers, The Catholic University of America (CUA).

Campaigning for the Republicans in the 1896 presidential campaign, Powderly was rewarded by President William McKinley with appointment as Commissioner General of Immigration. Powderly’s efforts to reform conditions at Ellis Island prompted President Theodore Roosevelt to dismiss him in 1902, though he was reinstated in 1906 as a Special Immigration Inspector.  Powderly next served as Chief of the Division of Information, U.S. Bureau of Immigration, 1907-1921, and as the U.S. Department of Labor’s Commissioner of Conciliation, 1921-1924. He was also author of Thirty Years a/Labor (1889) and his posthumous memoirs, The Path I Trod (1940). In 1999 was honored as an inductee into the U.S. Department of Labor’s Hall of Honor, joining figures such as rival Samuel Gompers and friend Mary Harris “Mother” Jones. Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: T.V. Powderly-Nineteenth-Century ‘American Idol’”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: The Tools, They Keep A-Changin’!

Sing along with me…the tools, they are a-changin’! Information management is a skill every researcher should practice. To be proficient at research, it helps to use digital tools.

Digital tools are essential for digital scholars.  Citation managers, or reference managers, are one of the basic tools used by librarians, faculty and students.

There are many citation manager products. It doesn’t matter which one you use – but use one! Many citation managers have the same functions. Citation managers allow you to save citation information (from online catalogs, databases, journals and web sites) as you search; organize citations into folders to share citations with group members or faculty; and create bibliographies. Many citation managers insert references while you are writing.

Again, it doesn’t matter which citation manager you use – use one! It is easy to import and export citations from one to another if you need to change reference managers. See this page from the University of Minnesota comparing citation managers or, see what the APA recommends.

CUA offers citation managers through the Guides, Tutorials and Tools link. One of the citation managers is RefWorks. This product is now in a new iteration. You may have used Legacy RefWorks, and now will begin the transition to New RefWorks. [Note: both will work for this semester! See RefWorks at CUA.] For more on RefWorks see video tutorials from the RefWorks Community. RefWorks help is available from the ProQuest RefWorks LibGuide. Sign up for RefWorks webinars.

 

 

 

 

 

News & Events: January 19, 2016

The Bodleian Library at Oxford

SEMITICS PUBLIC LECTURE – Mark Sheridan, OSB, CUA alumnus and former rector and dean of the faculty of the Pontifical Athenaeum of St. Anselm, Rome, will give a lecture on Monday, January 25 at 5:15 p.m. in the May Gallery of Mullen Library entitled “Hidden in Plain Sight: On the Trail of the Clarendon Press Manuscripts from Mullen Library (CUA) to the Bodleian (Oxford).” A reception will follow. For more information, please see the flyer here.

WRLC NEWSLETTER – The January edition of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) Newsletter is available. To subscribe to the newsletter, visit this page.

HELP AVAILABLE – We’re here to help connect you to the information and resources you need!

LIBRARY LOCATIONS – The University Libraries at CUA have several locations around campus. The main library is the John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library. Mullen Library is located across the University Lawn from the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, and houses the Oliveira Lima Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Semitics/ICOR Library. There are also four branch libraries:  Nursing/Biology in Gowan Hall, Music in Ward Hall, Architecture & Planning in the Crough Center, and Physics in Hannan Hall. The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives is located in Aquinas Hall. To see all library locations on a map, please visit http://libraries.cua.edu/about/collecs.cfm.