The Archivist’s Nook: Digitization – The Revenge

Archives staff using the Zeutschel  scanner.
Angela, scanning like a pro.

As John Shepherd wrote in last week’s blog, the first few years of the 2000s saw Catholic University getting its digital feet wet in collaboration with other members of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC). The products of that collaboration (since christened “Boutique Digital Collections”) are still amongst our most utilized online resources. The success of that project inspired the Archives to expand into a more fully realized digitization program, but it was not until 2014 that the will and resources coalesced to allow us to move forward.

In spring of last year, Catholic received delivery of a Zeutschel scanner from WRLC. Built for high speed scanning, shared between all member institutions, and circulated based on need, this scanner allowed us to pilot in-house digitization on a mass scale. Over a three month period, the Archives completed digitization of the Young Catholic Messenger, Iturbide-Kearney Family, and O’Donovan Rossa collections, as well as partial scanning of the NCWC Bulletin/Catholic Action periodical. By the time the Zeutschel left us, we had not only created 37,000 digital objects and associated metadata records, but also proven that we had the expertise and desire to incorporate manuscript digitization into our everyday workflow. Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: Digitization – The Revenge”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Summer Reading

Summer Reading – be it virtual or digital!

Rev. Brian J. Shanley OP spoke with CUA faculty last week. During his talk about “core curriculum” he mentioned titles along the way to inspire and inform.

plato Plato at the Googleplex

by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein

Person reading on beach. Image courtesy of Josué Goge, https://www.flickr.com/photos/9021032@N02/6981289900/
excellent-sheep-book-cover-1170x1743 Excellent sheep: the miseducation of the American elite and the way to a meaningful life

by William Deresiewicz

k9112 Not for profit : why democracy needs the humanities

by Martha C. Nussbaum

Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Summer Reading”

News & Events: May 18, 2015

Mullen LibrarySummer Hours – Our hours are reduced during the summer. For a complete schedule, including Mullen Library and campus library hours, please click here.

Popular Reading – Want to find some good recreational reading for the summer? Check out our Popular Readingcollection on the north end of the lobby of Mullen Library. Any faculty, staff, or student registered for summer or fall courses has borrowing privileges during the summer.

lynda.com  – Why not take advantage of the online learning video library at lynda.com during the summer break? Hit the ground running in the fall with courses on graphic design, time management, presentation skills, and so much more. Visit our lynda.com page to get started!

Streaming Audio – Did you know that CUA has a subscription to the Naxos Music Library? Log in to enjoy over 1.6 million tracks of classical, jazz, and world music. Want to listen on the go? Download the easy-to-use NML mobile app!

The Archivist’s Nook: Hark! The Digital Angel Comes!

Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact, Vol. 10, No. 14, March 24, 1955.
Treasure Chest, Vol. 10, No. 14, March 24, 1955.

My colleague Dr. Maria Mazzenga has blogged previously about digital materials, especially those used in the American Catholic History Classroom teaching sites. My intent here is to review the separate and distinct digital collections that originated from a 2001 grant from the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services’ National Leadership Program to The Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), of which CUA is a member. Each member was asked to provide materials for digitization via WRLC’s collaborative facilities known as the Digital Collection Production Center (DCPC), and CUA provided a total of ten collections during the DCPC’s era of operation, 2002-2010.

I confess that I am not one of those archivists mesmerized by every new shiny bauble that comes along, so I had curmudgeonly doubts about the utility of putting resources into digitizing at that time. Fortunately, taking a chance turned out to be the right thing to do as the collections selected (or ‘curated’) have been enduringly popular and frequently accessed by researchers. However, things have changed since 2010 and the process to create what many would call these ‘boutique’ collections is now being augmented, if not superseded, by mass digitization of a broader range of materials and formats (which my colleague Paul Kelly will talk more about future). Continue reading “The Archivist’s Nook: Hark! The Digital Angel Comes!”

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Newly Published

DateSign_Apr17Newly Published periodically highlights research produced at The Catholic University of America. These entries are indexed from the Web of Science (Arts & Humanities Index; Social Science Index; and Science Citation Index.) The entries below were indexed from April 17 – May 13, 2015.

Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Newly Published”

News & Events: May 11, 2015

CUA Commencement
Image courtesy of CUA Public Affairs.

Congratulations Class of 2015!

Reminders for Graduates – If you are graduating this Saturday, here are some important things to remember:

  • Log into My Library Account to check for any outstanding library loans or unpaid fines. Unpaid fines or overdue items will result in a hold on your account and prevent graduation. If you have any questions regarding your library account, please call Access Services at 202-319-5060.
  • Through the office of Alumni Relations, many library resources you enjoyed as a services are made available to you! If you are interested in continued access to these services, please visit the Benefits & Services page. You must register through Alumni Relations to take advantage of these benefits.
  • Please be aware that the lobby of Mullen Library will be open during Commencement (Saturday, May 16th, from 9 am until 3 pm).

Summer Hours – Our hours are reduced during the summer. For a complete schedule, including Mullen Library and campus library hours, please click here.

Popular Reading – Want to find some good recreational reading for the summer? Check out our Popular Reading collection on the north end of the lobby of Mullen Library. Any faculty, staff, or student registered for summer or fall courses has borrowing privileges during the summer.

lynda.com  – Why not take advantage of the online learning video library at lynda.com during the summer break? Hit the ground running in the fall with courses on graphic design, time management, presentation skills, and so much more. Visit our lynda.com page to get started!

Streaming Audio – Did you know that CUA has a subscription to the Naxos Music Library? Log in to enjoy over 1.6 million tracks of classical, jazz, and world music. Want to listen on the go? Download the easy-to-use NML mobile app!

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Humanities or Sciences?

Crossroads image between liberal arts and technology
From: http://www.seekingintellect.com/2014/11/15/walter-isaacson-on-innovation-and-the-collaboration-of-geniuses.html

Are we worried about too much Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) or the death of the humanities – or both? At many universities, including ours, we are having the conversations about making science more accessible to undergraduates in exploratory courses; and we are having the conversations about how science researchers can be better at communicating and creativity. We are also having a troubling conversation about how often a web site needs to be redesigned – yes, six years is way too long!

The following articles from many perspectives highlight the dichotomy between the humanities and sciences in higher education today that, hopefully, will inform higher education in the future.

Two excellent articles outline out the case for the importance of both humanities and sciences.

“A broad general education helps foster critical thinking and creativity. Exposure to a variety of fields produces synergy and cross fertilization. Yes, science and technology are crucial components of this education, but so are English and philosophy.”

“Turning to events internal to the intellectual world, we notice that during the last 150 years the humanities became radically eclipsed, even delegitimized, by the phenomenal success of their great intellectual rival, the hard sciences. The latter have rapidly built up an unprecedented edifice of knowledge. It is not only intellectually or theoretically superior to everything before — precise, systematic, and empirically verifiable — but also superior in its practical utility, generating unimagined new technologies for the improvement of human life. Today scientific knowledge is equated with real knowledge, all the rest seeming like folklore. All modern intellectuals suffer from physics envy. But even the extraordinary rise of modern science cannot adequately explain the current fate of the humanities. Empirical science is competent in the realm of measurable facts, but not in the realm of values. The wisdom of life and knowledge of the self that we desperately need come, not from scientific data, but from reflective accounts of the inner experience of being alive as a human being, and especially of being most fully, intensely, and authentically alive. The sciences eclipse the humanities in one way, but render them more necessary in another. By vastly expanding our power for good and ill, the rise of modern science greatly increases our need for self-­knowledge and moral clarity.” Continue reading “Digital Scholarship @ CUA: Humanities or Sciences?”

News & Events: May 4, 2015

Image of exam takers.FINALS WEEK – For finals week, we are pleased to provide:

  • 24-Hour Access – Mullen Library will be open around the clock Monday through Friday. Saturday, Mullen will be open 9 am to 5 pm.
  • Coffee, Tea, and Snacks – Visit the May Gallery in Mullen Library for refreshments.
  • Take a Break From the Books – The Counseling Center is hosting an event on Tuesday, May 5th in the May Gallery. Click here for more information.

Subject Librarians – Please note that there have been several changes to our subject librarians. Please visit this page to see a list of current subject librarians.

Graduating this May? – If you will be graduating this semester, please make sure your library account is in good standing before May 15. You may do this by logging into My Library Account to check for any outstanding library loans or unpaid fines. Unpaid fines or overdue items will result in a hold on your account and prevent graduation. If you have any questions regarding your library account, please call Access Services at 202-319-5060.

Have a great summer!  ·  Congratulations graduates!

 

Digital Scholarship @ CUA: STM Tech Trends 2015

STM Tech Trends 2015 Infographic
STM Tech Trends 2015

In an earlier post, we noted the complex scholarly ecosystem consisting of changing platforms, new tools, and new work flows for researchers and academic libraries. This week we get another view of the future of scholarly research from the  International Association of STM Publishers (STM) as they published their 2015 Tech Trends (and infographic.)

Notable in the STM trends analysis is the emphasis on research data. They also highlight the need for reputation management, both for individual researchers and institutions as they reply to mandates from funding entities. The trend of the changing research product (or the research article +) will impact researchers, publishers and libraries.

“… the developing form of the scholarly article as published output encompasses a variety of non-textual forms of content (video, data, software methods, other media, etc.). Those elements will ultimately be packaged, presented, and preserved in a smart network of connections that more effectively meet the needs of specific communities. In such a smart network, is the traditional article still recognized as in the print environment? Not necessarily, and even the term “article” may be a misnomer of sorts. But whatever those packaged elements may be called, it is clear that STM publishers are thinking about what form the evolving scholarly record may take in science and in academia.”

Source: Emerging from the STM Meeting: 2015 Top Tech Trends by Jill O’Neill 4.27.2015

See the STM Tech Trends 2015 web site for more details.